Author Topic: Famous JH Residents  (Read 39379 times)

Offline toddg

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Famous JH Residents
« on: March 01, 2008, 11:33:47 PM »
It's always interesting to read about who has roots in our neighborhood.  The JH origins of Lucy Liu and Don Rickles have received a lot of attention.  Some people try to blame us for Howard Stern, but while he was born here, I don't think he ever lived here.  On this board, Chuckster posted an appreciation of an actress who lived in JH named Helen Kane.  The Wikipedia entry on Jackson Heights lists other celebrities who have lived in the neighborhood.

I bring this up because I was interested to read that Newsweek columnist and McLaughlin Group regular Eleanor Clift also grew up in Jackson Heights.  She discusses this in an interview in tomorrow's NY Times Magazine.

Anybody know any other famous former residents of the neighborhood?
« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 01:50:24 AM by toddg »

Offline Chuckster

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 12:01:28 AM »
Remember Chip, the young son from the comedy Kate & Allie starring Jane Curtain and Susan St. James?  Chip was played by Frederick Koehler.  My brother claims to have seen him many times roaming the neighborhood.

Kevin Dobson, well known for his role on the once popular nighttime serial called Knots Landing was also a JH resident.


« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 12:10:21 AM by Chuckster »
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Bob the Astorian

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2008, 07:59:46 AM »

Offline erospolitico

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2008, 09:46:53 AM »
Fred definitely lived here, he was my neighbor down in the lower 70's

Offline Chuckster

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2008, 01:53:03 PM »
While reading Bob's post, it occurred to me that Jackson Heights has always been a hot bed for musicians and performers dating back to vaudevillian days.  I would love to learn more on this topic.  So far, I've come across information stating that Benny Goodman shared an apartment in Jackson Heights along with his family.  A while back I also discovered a vintage video of a group of musicians from the Big Bad era that also called Jackson Heights home.  If I remember correctly, the video details the building where the band's jam sessions were held.  Imagine that from your neighbors!  Anyway, I can't seem to find the video now, so if anyone knows what I'm talking about, please post a link! 
The Chuckster has spoken!

Offline intercaecos

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2008, 03:47:19 PM »
In fact, three of the greatest bandleaders of the jazz era -- Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and Woody Herman -- were all residents of Jackson Heights.  I can't understand why this amazing bit of information is omitted from the Wikipedia entry, as their stature dwarfs that of nearly all those listed.

Offline Shelby2

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2008, 04:27:06 PM »
The famous photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt lived in Jackson Heights.
His most famous photograph is of an American sailor kissing a young woman on V-J Day in Times Square in 1945.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Eisenstaedt
« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 05:50:34 PM by toddg »

Bob the Astorian

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2008, 06:06:53 PM »
Wow!  Great finds here - I guess we all had to do a little digging.  I've also found that Les Paul and Mary Ford lived in Jackson Heights in 1953 and in fact, invented the 8-track tape recorder (not the 8-track tape player) while there...

ref: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan07/articles/classictracks_0107.htm


Quote from web page:

Eight-track came along a short time after 'How High The Moon'; conceived in 1953 when Les and Mary were living in Jackson Heights, a neighbourhood of Queens, New York, and operational by 1956. Originally, he presented his idea to Westrex in LA, and after this and another company rejected it he found more receptive ears at Ampex in San Francisco.
"We had a meeting, which was attended by everybody in the place, and they were terribly excited about it," Les recalls. "They said, 'It can be done. It means we're going to have to develop a staff of people and go to work on this thing, but we will make you a multitrack machine.'"

Which they did, developing 'Sel-Sync' (Selective Synchronous Recording) while the resultant unit was twice flown back to San Francisco to correct problems that Les unearthed at his home in Jackson Heights.

"For one thing, they didn't have a master bias oscillator," he explains. "They had eight individual oscillators controlling each track —there were eight tape recorders, eight sets of electronics, each self-powered with their own biasing, and of course they would conflict with each other. One master oscillator was the way to go, so we did that. Then the second error they made was to make the machine 30/60 [ips] instead of 15/30, so all the EQs were wrong, both on the recording side and on the playback side, and they therefore had to redo that. There were also two or three other minor errors that they had to correct, and after quite a while of going back and forth and debugging the system we basically changed it almost completely from what it originally was going to be.

"We built the board at the same time, we got the remotes in so that all the controls were right on there, and that board, which did everything that I wished it to do, was married to the eight-track. The board we called the Monster and the eight-track we called the Octopus. I still have that all-tube board — it hasn't gone to the museum yet — which was just about as modern as you could get, with inbuilt EQ, vibro, filters, you name it, and a great, warm, sound. People would fight for it today.

"At the same time as all that was being developed, across the hallway [in their San Francisco facility] Ampex was working on colour video picture — I could walk over there and talk to Ray Dolby and the guys working on the video, and then walk back to the room where we were doing the audio. Both those things would make history and change the world, but at the time I had no idea we were going to change anything. All I knew was that I had a machine with tape delay on it, the ability to change speeds and fidelity that was good. It was just a blessing."

Offline intercaecos

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2008, 06:16:54 PM »
Wow!  Great finds here - I guess we all had to do a little digging.  I've also found that Les Paul and Mary Ford lived in Jackson Heights in 1953 and in fact, invented the 8-track tape recorder (not the 8-track tape player) while there...

Now, that is news to me!  For all those out there who may not know, Les Paul also invented the solid-body electric guitar.

Offline ECG

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2008, 06:40:09 PM »
Going back to the era of Radio, Joseph Curtin, the voice of Mr. North of Mr. & Mrs. North mystery radio show lived on 80th St. He was Jane Curtin's uncle.

Offline Miss Chatelaine

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2008, 08:15:26 PM »
Gene Simmons, of KISS, lived at 33-51 84th Street and went to 145 and Newtown according to this article

http://www.kissasylum.com/news/NYdailyNews072901.shtml


judibean

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2008, 07:53:50 PM »
The man who invented Scrabble, Alfred Mosher Butts, lived here.  There's a street sign (maybe in the 80's?) that has numeric values assigned to each letter of the street.  That's pretty neat!   

Offline buddy

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2008, 09:08:44 PM »
John Leguizamo I think grew up here and one of the first "super models" Dovima (Worked closely with photographer Richard Avedon in the 1950s and became one of the world's top fashion models. When the musical Funny Face (1957) was produced based on Avedon's career, Dovima was given a role in the film.)
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Offline ECG

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2008, 12:05:57 AM »
The man who invented Scrabble, Alfred Mosher Butts, lived here.  There's a street sign (maybe in the 80's?) that has numeric values assigned to each letter of the street.  That's pretty neat!   

Mr. & Mrs Butts lived in my building for many years. They were a really sweet couple. The sign is on the corner of 81st and 35th Ave.

Offline jennsch

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 10:22:32 AM »
Journalist Eleanor Clift grew up here...

"I grew up in Jackson Heights, Queens, and my father had a deli, Roeloffs Deli, in Sunnyside. My mother made the German potato salad, the egg custard and rice pudding, and I didn’t learn any of the recipes. I should have."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/02/magazine/02wwln-Q4-t.html?ref=magazine

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Re: Famous JH Residents
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 10:22:32 AM »