Author Topic: Thoughts on Hampton Court  (Read 8333 times)

Offline adam765

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Thoughts on Hampton Court
« on: February 03, 2010, 01:56:45 PM »
Hello All,

I'm considering buying a Co-Op at Hampton Court, but know little about the buildings. Anyone live there or have any insights? I live nearby, so I know it's in a great location, on a good block, etc.  I'm wondering about the garden policies, condition of the buildings, and just general impressions I guess.

Thanks in advance.
Adam.

Offline whoever

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2010, 03:13:34 PM »
I heard every entrance is a different co-op, so it's hard to know them all.  On the +/- side, you will be a board member :rockon:

Offline petegart

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2010, 07:00:16 PM »
It's true that every building is unique, but my partner and I were looking to buy in March 2008, found a nice 2 bedroom, put in an offer and we waited more than six months to be rejected.  Now we were paying cash, we both have good long term jobs, -it was a clear case of prejudice -so I have a bad attitude about those buildings.  -ps- we wound up buying a beautiful three bedroom apt in the Greystones.  I am now the co-op president -and we love our neighbors!

Offline Marlene

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 08:00:10 PM »
Hi,

petegart:  I'm glad that things worked out at the end, as they usually do.

My question is the following.  You made the offer, then negotiated, went into contract, submitted the board application, you met the board and then you were rejected.  And that process took six months?

And this was an all cash transaction?

Best,   :smiley6600:

Offline dotley

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2010, 07:01:29 AM »
I have lived in Hampton Court for a long time.  The upside is the user friendly garden. It is a quiet & beautiful haven in this noisy and bustling neighborhood. It feels more like living in a townhouse or brownstone than apartment building.  There is a certain charm to that.  There is, however, more participation required in smaller buildings that can be tedious and at times contentious. Each repair requires volunteers to research, recommend and supervise the designated project.
Each building in Hampton Court is separately managed, some are self managed, others have a managing agent who does the bookkeeping.
Each building has a part time live in supt whose skills vary.  If you have any specific questions, please let me know.

Offline petegart

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2010, 08:54:29 AM »
Marlene, I don't want to hijack this thread.  We made the offer, it was accepted, we waited more than six months for an interview.  All during this time they had copies of the financials.  We never met the board.  I had the impression that they were hoping us queers would go away -but we were determined.  We then received notice that we were denied. period. 

Offline Marlene

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2010, 10:20:34 AM »
Marlene, I don't want to hijack this thread.  We made the offer, it was accepted, we waited more than six months for an interview.  All during this time they had copies of the financials.  We never met the board.  I had the impression that they were hoping us queers would go away -but we were determined.  We then received notice that we were denied. period.  

petegart:

It is my belief that it is important to share your experience as a potential buyer in Jackson Heights.  An efficient board, admissions committee and management of any JH co-op is exactly what shareholder's want for their property.  

At some point we will either buy or sell, and this process will involve money that is taken and held during the contract, and application period.  The seller's will as well be looking to move to another property, and the same will apply as they may go into contract, and as well have application fees.  Although unfortunate, these posts are helpful to all.  

In your particular case, there was certainly lack of efficiency within the process as it takes approximately four weeks to gather all the board members, discuss an application and come to a decision, so that you can move on and so can the seller.  Anything else that may have transpired should have been discussed and addressed by your attorney.

I must admit that I have had a few of my buyer's rejected (one being an all-cash buyer), and although they were very disappointed, they moved on to another property and were welcomed with open arms.

Thank you for sharing and I do know that your neighbors love you too!

Best,   :smiley6600:
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 10:27:18 AM by Marlene »

Offline asaha

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2010, 09:21:00 PM »
Marlene, were the buyers you represented ever given a reason for the rejection? Esp the ones paying cash. Or does a reason have to be given?  I'm curious as to how this system works. I'm in a coop in JH and thought the coop interview was a formality if your finances were in order. Sounds like I was naive. Thanks.

Offline Marlene

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2010, 09:57:37 PM »
Marlene, were the buyers you represented ever given a reason for the rejection? Esp the ones paying cash. Or does a reason have to be given?  I'm curious as to how this system works. I'm in a coop in JH and thought the coop interview was a formality if your finances were in order. Sounds like I was naive. Thanks.

Hi,

The board or admissions committee does not have to give you a reason for rejecting your application.

Best,   :smiley6600:

Offline Mr Shankly

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2010, 09:40:08 PM »
It's true that every building is unique, but my partner and I were looking to buy in March 2008, found a nice 2 bedroom, put in an offer and we waited more than six months to be rejected.  Now we were paying cash, we both have good long term jobs, -it was a clear case of prejudice -so I have a bad attitude about those buildings.  -ps- we wound up buying a beautiful three bedroom apt in the Greystones.  I am now the co-op president -and we love our neighbors!

That's awful, I'm sorry to hear of your experience since I live in Hampton Court. I know my coop alone has several gay residents and we would have welcomed you with open arms.

Offline earlie

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2010, 09:34:46 AM »
I'm not doubting that people can be horribly judgmental, but are you sure this is why you were rejected? My friend and her husband were rejected because they freelance, even though they make a lot of $$.

Offline petegart

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2010, 07:56:33 AM »
First I want to say the 2 bedroom apt we made an offer on was lovely.  The building we looked at in Hampton court looked solid, well built, and well maintained.  The apt was full of nautral light, the floors were beautiful, and we liked the layout.  It had extra deep closets and seemed perfect -also it's close to the subway.  -unfortunately it did not work out.  I have been with the same fortune 500 company over 20 years, and my partner is a teacher in the same school for over 11 years.  -We have an amazing creait score and it became obvious they did not want us.  End of story.

More importantly -Has there ever been a thread about boards in buildings that are notorious for dragging out the buying/selling process?  -As president I feel that I have an obligation to assist my neighbors when they are in the stressful process of selling their place.   Thanks.. 

Offline Marlene

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Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2010, 01:32:58 PM »
More importantly -Has there ever been a thread about boards in buildings that are notorious for dragging out the buying/selling process?  -As president I feel that I have an obligation to assist my neighbors when they are in the stressful process of selling their place.   Thanks.. 

Hi,
I'm not aware of any of the board's being notorious for dragging their feet.  But I will tell you that there is one building that does the application process differently.

The board will have you complete the application first, meet you to approve or disapprove you, and then have you complete the contract and mortgage application process last.

It's a interesting way of doing things, and it works for that particular property.  They don't believe that there needs to be such a long waiting period for the buyer or seller to know whether he/she/they has/have been approved.  I will point out that in addition, the board doesn't have to see the contract of sale at the interview. 

Best,   :smiley6600:

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Thoughts on Hampton Court
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2010, 01:32:58 PM »