Author Topic: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study  (Read 35837 times)

Offline Beech Court

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #120 on: November 10, 2011, 10:59:31 AM »
The study area was from 69th Street to 82nd Street from 35th Avenue to Broadway and included a chunk of Elmhurst. The Historic District only partially overlapped with the study area.   

Although this thread is about the Transportation Study when I made my statement I was thinking of larger issues as well. Western JH is not really protected in any of the same ways as the historic district. We might have designation from the federal and state government but nothing from the city. That means that all sorts of things can and do happen that couldn't within the historic boundries as presently defined.
I also channel Gladys Gilbert!

Offline lilo

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #121 on: November 10, 2011, 11:20:55 AM »
The petition on 75th Street is in response to unproductive emails/conversations with Maura McCarthy of the DOT and Council Member Danny Dromm. It is not an ultimatum, but an attempt to reopen the dialogue by showing strength in numbers. Removing those flyers from poles and business windows is cowardly. Furthermore, to describe a simple flyer as an infraction to the beauty of Jackson Heights is absurd. How can anyone who cares about the "beauty" of this neighborhood be immune to the filth, noise, and chaos that is spilling over from the business district?! Take off your rose colored glasses and get real. The outcome of this study just pitted one street against another and failed to address the fact that driving/parking/living in J.H. is an urban nightmare.

Offline Jack Heights

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #122 on: November 10, 2011, 01:23:53 PM »
Flyers placed on lamp posts and trees is littering, no matter what they are advertising. Whether it is a hotel that rents by the hour or a community petition, posting flyers like that is illegal.

The petition that is going around demands that changes be reversed, it says nothing about reopening a conversation. Further, it is unclear as to who is really behind this petition since it's only signed "Residents of 75th Street" no one's name is on it no one is taking responsibility for it. But someone is claiming to represent all the residents of 75th Street by circulating it. If you think taking down illegal signs is cowardly, so is circulating an anonymous petition.

Has anyone requested a meeting with DOT or Dromm's office ? If so did they flat out say no? I find that really hard to believe. 

Offline lilo

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #123 on: November 10, 2011, 01:52:47 PM »
Setting up a protest site in Zuccotti Park is also illegal, but it was necessary in order to draw attention to a crisis that isn't being adequately addressed. The same holds true for those petition flyers that are requesting (not demanding) that the DOT review and reverse their decision to change the flow of traffic and move 2 bus routes to 75th St. (no mention of moving them back to 73rd St. as far as I can see).

Danny Dromm's response to a letter signed by a 75th Street co-op board: Discuss this matter with Maura McCarthy.

Maura McCarthy's resonse: The DOT is still evaluating the area (e.g., by tweaking the amount of green light time), but has no plans to change any of the study's major implentations.

Offline toddg

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #124 on: November 10, 2011, 04:31:38 PM »
The buses weren't moved from 73rd Street because residents of that street didn't want the buses there.  If the MTA did that, they'd be shuffling bus routes around all the time, depending on who complained the loudest in any given year.  The buses were moved from 73rd Street because that street couldn't handle all of the traffic that was trying to squeeze onto it.  It is a narrow street that was simultaneously serving as a commercial strip, a transit route, a route for local traffic, and a route for cars dropping passengers off at the subway station.   The changes that the city implemented were designed to distribute this activity more evenly through the neighborhood.

I think that overall, these changes work well, and are a big net positive for the community as a whole.  And I say that as a resident of a building along 77th Street, which saw some increased traffic as a result of the changes.   DOT was responsive to the earlier problems with not enough capacity on the lights on 77th Street, and from what I can tell, the problem has largely been addressed.  If there are similar problems with capacity on 75th Street, then I haven't seen them.

Offline theplanesland

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Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #125 on: November 14, 2011, 12:43:06 PM »
Yes, one of the critical problems with the buses on 73rd Street was that because 73rd was bumper-to-bumper so much of the time, buses would get stuck (usually between 35th and 37th Avenues) and it would delay the schedules. Nothing was moving.

I think the larger problem is that too many businesses in the 73rd/74th Street corridors seem to rely on people coming from Richmond Hill and Nassau County by car, and there's no parking for those people. Street parking won't solve this problem, and especially on weekends, too much of the traffic on 72/73/74 is people cruising for spaces. We need a municipal parking structure.

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Jackson Heights Neighborhood Transportation Study
« Reply #125 on: November 14, 2011, 12:43:06 PM »