Author Topic: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network  (Read 569 times)

Offline Shelby2

  • Global Moderator
  • Mayor
  • *****
  • Posts: 5163
Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« on: May 19, 2020, 05:40:21 PM »
https://gothamist.com/food/youre-floating-and-youre-sinking-and-youre-drowning-going-hungry-in-nyc-during-coronavirus

In March, as the pandemic struck New York City, Sharmila Moonga was living on her own in Queens with a disability, when her food began to run out.
“You know, I tried to ring 311 and I couldn't get through to a person who would actually speak to me,” she said.
Moonga, a 53-year-old British Indian immigrant, has a type of cancer that’s left her with a compromised immune system and difficulty walking. She was scared of stepping out, even into her hallway. The couple of friends she would have turned to for help became ill. The supermarket around the corner stopped doing deliveries. And the gurdwara, or Sikh temple, she normally attended for services and for the occasional meal had suddenly closed.
“There were times when I thought I'd knock on the door or slip a note under somebody’s door and say, ‘I've run out of milk,’” she said. “I never, never built up the courage to do that. I felt vulnerable. I felt embarrassed. And I felt ‘I can survive this.’”

Click for entire article

Offline itsit

  • Mayor
  • *******
  • Posts: 683
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2020, 10:57:57 AM »
 Hearing this story is heartbreaking and to think that it happened right here in JH is awful. Thanks to Nuala's group, Neighbors Helping Neighbors, for getting her some food. They are doing the good work!

  On a couple of notes, I wanted to add something. One is that my neighbor in a similar shape has been getting the 311 meals delivered every three days and they are nicely prepared meals and a good haul of food, especially for one person. Please keep trying to reach them as these food deliveries are worth the effort. Also, I think this woman's fears were heightened by our proximity to Elmhurst Hospital which was getting an enormous amount of scary press for some weeks making going outside extra fearful and this
was not mentioned, at least what I heard.

Online KGDHP

  • Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 110
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2020, 05:05:47 PM »
This is a really sad article. Makes me very sad that this happened nearby and grateful for our neighbors who have stepped up to help during this crisis.

I'm not trying to be judgmental, but I am genuinely curious. How does one go 2 weeks on the brink of starvation, eating paper, but not knock on a neighbor's door? I do not understand the rationale. How can pride/fear overtake the survival instinct?

Anecdote: I once lived next to an elderly lady in a similar situation, who, one summer, missed meals from Citymeals on Wheels and after a few days, she marched right over to my door and kindly asked for help. I went out and shopped for her, and as a result, she and I entered into a deeper friendship. I am about 3,000% sure if this lady had done the same, any one of her neighbors would have helped.

Also, assuming she lives in a Jax coop...their board didn't offer assistance to shareholders/residents??????? My gosh, in our building we sent out a note in March with a list of phone numbers and contact information of boardmembers offering assistance. I can't believe this didn't happen here. :(

Online dssjh

  • Mayor
  • *******
  • Posts: 4896
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2020, 06:07:13 PM »
newer immigrants, particularly from some cultures, are taught from an early age that asking for help is a sign of weakness. in poorer areas, people tend to reach out to those in need before the need is expressed -- see the Chasids in NYC.

as far as living in a co-op, i don't recall her saying she did. did i miss that?

Online KGDHP

  • Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 110
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2020, 06:21:46 PM »
newer immigrants, particularly from some cultures, are taught from an early age that asking for help is a sign of weakness. in poorer areas, people tend to reach out to those in need before the need is expressed -- see the Chasids in NYC.

as far as living in a co-op, i don't recall her saying she did. did i miss that?

No no, it was never stated. I was just thinking since she lives in the area it might be likely, but certainly not a given.

My mom lives in a rental building nearby (not in Jax) and even their management company sent around a notice with info for anyone who needed assistance. I suppose this falls into the same situation of not wanting to ask for help.

I feel for her, I just can't believe she went so long to reach out. She put herself at such risk. Also the temple she mentioned just closed outright and there was no one she could call? There's this board and a Jackson Heights FB group! There's just so many options for non contact communication. Also, if she wasn't digitally savvy, how did Gothamist pick up her story? How did she call Nuala? I just have so many questions.

Online KGDHP

  • Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 110
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2020, 06:34:01 PM »
Oh wait...she HAS been all over commenting on the Jackson Heights FB page (assuming it is the same woman). Ok, so she has access to a phone and/or a computer...and she commented on a post about waiting on line to get hand sanitizer at Travers Park, so she at some point went outside.

This story is sad. A little confusing. But mostly frustrating that no one helped her/she didn't proactively seek help and yet comments things like "no one cares about me." Am I mean for even going down this internet rabbit hole? I'll leave it be.

Offline Shelby2

  • Global Moderator
  • Mayor
  • *****
  • Posts: 5163
Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 10:33:43 PM »
newer immigrants, particularly from some cultures, are taught from an early age that asking for help is a sign of weakness. in poorer areas, people tend to reach out to those in need before the need is expressed -- see the Chasids in NYC.

as far as living in a co-op, i don't recall her saying she did. did i miss that?

She's not a newer immigrant. She immigrated in the late '90s, so at least 20 years ago. That said, for anyone, it can be difficult to ask for help, especially if you've never needed that kind of help before. She mentioned she felt she had failed as a woman, regarding not keeping the pantry stocked.

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Hungry neighbors helped by JH Covid Care Network
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 10:33:43 PM »