Author Topic: MTA says billions needed to revive old Rockaway LIRR track(through Roosevelt Av)  (Read 627 times)

Offline jh35

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MTA says billions needed to revive old Rockaway LIRR track

https://ny.curbed.com/2019/10/9/20906811/rockaway-beach-branch-lirr-subway-feasibility-study


The MTA has released a preliminary study detailing the barriers and costs associated with reactivating a stretch of Long Island Rail Road track in eastern Queens that’s been out of use since the early 1960s—a move that would ostensibly save straphangers valuable commuting time and economically boost the historically middle-class neighborhoods surrounding it.

The study, first cited by The City, looks into the feasibility of reactivating the Rockaway Beach Branch for Long Island Railroad or subway use, connecting commuters from Howard Beach, Queens to Midtown.

The study estimates that if the track is reactivated as LIRR, some 11,000 riders would use the line on an average weekday for a ride that would take about 30 minutes between Howard Beach and Penn Station. If the Rockaway Beach Branch is reintegrated into the LIRR plan, it would connect to the main line at Rego Park and continue south to Howard Beach. This would mean a new storage and maintenance yard for the trains would need to be established near the Howard Beach Station....

If the track becomes an extension of the subway, the study estimates that some 47,000 riders would use the track daily for a commute between Howard Beach and Herald Square that would take about 45 minutes. With the subway extension, the RBB would connect to the Queens Boulevard line at 63rd Drive-Rego Park and continue along the existing A track. The extension would require the construction of a new tunnel for a direct underground connection to the Queens Boulevard line at 64th Street.
[The badly written article says it would hook up to the A train. The map shows that it would connect to the M and R line.]

....The work, of course, will come at a great cost. (This is a project related to the MTA, after all.) SYSTRA Engineering, who was commissioned by the agency in October 2017 to carry out the study, estimates that it will cost $6.7 billion to reactivate the stretch as LIRR, and $8.1 billion to connect the stretch to the subway (and that doesn’t include the cost of land that would have to be acquired to complete the projects.)....


This new line would go through the Roosevelt Ave station.

8.1 billion divided by 47,000 riders is $172,400 per each rider.





Offline carrefour_ny

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This is such BS. The MTA can't think in smaller increments than billions. Just the other day they announced they'd be installing elevators in 70 stations for a total cost of $5.5 billion, i.e., $80 million per station. Are you kidding me?

Offline jh35

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This is such BS. The MTA can't think in smaller increments than billions. Just the other day they announced they'd be installing elevators in 70 stations for a total cost of $5.5 billion, i.e., $80 million per station. Are you kidding me?

While I was posting this I was thinking, "They have billions for this but can not keep the stairs at Diversity Plaza clean."

Offline temujin

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This is such BS. The MTA can't think in smaller increments than billions. Just the other day they announced they'd be installing elevators in 70 stations for a total cost of $5.5 billion, i.e., $80 million per station. Are you kidding me?

While I was posting this I was thinking, "They have billions for this but can not keep the stairs at Diversity Plaza clean."

Well said, and that entrance always flood when rain. I assume MTA is the landlord for those tenants there, shouldn't these tenants files a complaint to city about slumlord for not doing their part.

Offline EmmBee

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Interesting.

The RPA priced the huge Triboro line at about $2B.  http://library.rpa.org/interactive/the-triboro/

This Howard Beach line is maybe a third of the length and four times the cost? 

Although I wonder what the MTA would say the Triboro would cost.

Offline JK resident

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The MTA owns the entrance at Diversity Plaza. It is their responsibility to clean and maintain the entrance. The stores are owned by the owner of the building. The MTA should of acquired the property years ago and install another elevator at that entrance to the subway but they instead abandoned the entrance when they moved the buses to 75th street. This allowed the whole Plaza to be built. The MTA considers one elevator at the main station to be enough. Good luck trying to get the MTA to spend any money at the Plaza. 

Offline theplanesland

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While I was posting this I was thinking, "They have billions for this but can not keep the stairs at Diversity Plaza clean."

That's because it would clearly cost the MTA $860 million to clean the stairs at 73rd Street.

Offline theplanesland

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Interesting.

The RPA priced the huge Triboro line at about $2B.  http://library.rpa.org/interactive/the-triboro/

This Howard Beach line is maybe a third of the length and four times the cost? 

Although I wonder what the MTA would say the Triboro would cost.

THIS is the problem - MTA costs are wildly out of control. Jessica Ramos knows this but nobody knows what to do about it because the problem is at so many levels. It's not just unions or contractors or consultants, it's not solvable by making things more state-run or privatizing them - it's how every organization the MTA touches, public OR private, has become a self-reinforcing omniweb of corruption.

"For years, The Times found, public officials have stood by as a small group of politically connected labor unions, construction companies and consulting firms have amassed large profits."

"Trade unions, which have closely aligned themselves with Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and other politicians, have secured deals requiring underground construction work to be staffed by as many as four times more laborers than elsewhere in the world, documents show.

Construction companies, which have given millions of dollars in campaign donations in recent years, have increased their projected costs by up to 50 percent when bidding for work from the M.T.A., contractors say.

Consulting firms, which have hired away scores of M.T.A. employees, have persuaded the authority to spend an unusual amount on design and management, statistics indicate.

Public officials, mired in bureaucracy, have not acted to curb the costs. The M.T.A. has not adopted best practices nor worked to increase competition in contracting, and it almost never punishes vendors for spending too much or taking too long, according to inspector general reports.

At the heart of the issue is the obscure way that construction costs are set in New York. Worker wages and labor conditions are determined through negotiations between the unions and the companies, none of whom have any incentive to control costs. The transit authority has made no attempt to intervene to contain the spending."

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/28/nyregion/new-york-subway-construction-costs.html

Offline r

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The subway alignment would be so good. It would make it a lot easier to get to the beach and maybe make it quicker to get to JFK (at least, there would be an alternate way to get to JFK).

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