Author Topic: Want to get community solar in Queens?  (Read 1027 times)

Offline mlarosa10000

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Want to get community solar in Queens?
« on: November 04, 2017, 02:38:58 PM »
Hi all,
Is anyone interested in community solar in Queens? I am in touch with a company starting up in NYC, they've done community solar for renters in Mt. Vernon and are starting projects in Brooklyn and Queens.
Community solar is a way for people who live in apartments to "lease" solar panels on other roofs, and buy clean power through solar. It is transferred through your utility bill, you still get a ConEd bill. It is prices the same as you currently pay or cheaper.
If you are interested please let me know! I am trying to arrange an in-person evening meeting with this company's rep, in JH, to answer questions. It is a new business model for electricity and a way to buy clean power if you don't own your own roof (and thus cannot put solar panels on it) Ideally this meeting would take place before Thanksgiving.
This is the company: https://www.thepowermarket.com/
Thanks!
Melanie

Offline Gordan

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2017, 04:49:32 PM »
Hi!

YES! I am interested. I have been thinking about how to get this happening here. I currently use clean choice energy as an ESCO, which I recommend to anyone. I pay through ConEd and there was no difference in my bill after I signed up.

Keep me posted!

Offline Gordan

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 07:38:18 AM »
I received a notice about a Bronx based community solar project. I'm already signed up. In light of this week's grim warning from the UN this is great timing for something like this.

https://cleanchoiceenergy.com/news/Enrollment%20Launched%20for%20Bronx%20Community%20Solar/

NY State is actually one of the best places for renewable energy policy because we have the ability to elect which source of energy we want to use through Con Ed. If you don't make the choice yourself then, they choose whatever for you.

I made the switch about two years ago and my bill has actually gone down right afterwards. I liked Clean Choice because their CEO seems like a righteous guy who was involved in Moveon.org.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/27/business/energy-environment/applying-the-lessons-of-politics-to-green-power.html

https://twitter.com/tommatzzie?lang=en

Other options are Green Mountain Energy but, they are owned by NRG which still uses fossil fuels. They still even use
coal.

https://www.nrg.com/generation/coal.html

https://www.greenmountainenergy.com/our-story/news-room/press-releases/576-nrg-energy-completes-acquisition-of-green-mountain-energy-company-the-leading-retail-provider-of-clean-energy-products-and-services/


Offline Travis PowerMarket

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 02:50:20 PM »
I agree with you Gordan, in light of the UN report, it's especially important to do what we can to curb our emissions. The community solar model is one of those ways that allows anyone (even those that are renters or don't have the money to buy their own solar panels) to be part of the solution.
I'm seeing now that this thread has been up for a while. I came out to Melanie's building and met with a bunch of people last year to talk about the Queens project, and it was a delight. That project is now full, but we have another in Brooklyn that's still open for enrollment and anyone in the 5 boroughs can join. Head to https://powermarket.io/marketplace.html or send me an email and I can answer any questions about enrollment.
I'd also love to come out again to any community events to talk about energy and the effect our choices can have.

Offline Gordan

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2018, 08:12:24 PM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/06/solar-panel-waste-environmental-threat-clean-energy

Thanks for sharing this tidbit of misinformation. Maybe you think that wind power is bad too because it kills birds. The number two story on National Review is called "Doubling Down on Global-Warming Alarmism'' written by Neo-con Jonathan Tobin.

There is NOTHING political about this. Everyone lives on this planet. All sides of the political spectrum should care. If you are a republican you should be concerned that the US's GDP will take a substantial hit from the effects of climate change. The only reason any GOP politicians combat this is because they are bankrolled by the fossil fuel industry.

If you hate Socialism, then lets end these programs that prop up coal and let the market decide. Green Energy is a job creator.


Offline Gordan

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 08:37:47 PM »
Sorry just wanted to add that the National Review article posted sited a study by a group called Environmental Progress founded by "Pro Nuclear" Michael Shellenberger. He advocates for the continued use of nuclear energy. And his books have been criticized by the Sierra Club. Nuclear is yet another failing poison industry lobbying the government for a bailout to keep it afloat.

Offline carrefour_ny

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2018, 08:45:50 PM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/06/solar-panel-waste-environmental-threat-clean-energy

Read in context. The National Review is a conservative publication, and attacking clean energy fits their political agenda.

Offline deja

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2018, 11:58:27 PM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/06/solar-panel-waste-environmental-threat-clean-energy

Read in context. The National Review is a conservative publication, and attacking clean energy fits their political agenda.


That may be so, but it's also important to consider the entire life cycle of a product or system before deciding it is clean.  Or clean enough because nothing is going to be a panacea.  It's not an issue right now because there aren't enough panels hitting end of life yet but that will drastically change in around 15 years when the wave of panels installed in the last decade start reaching their end of life. 

Currently most discarded panels end up in landfill.  Some are recycled, but there is no regulatory requirement to do so.  Unfortunately there isn't much incentive for voluntary recycling because the breakdown products are not very valuable.  Depending on the cell type this can be 76%-89% glass, 7%-8% aluminum, 4-10% polymer, 5% silicon for silicon cells, and very small amounts of silver, tin, lead, copper, indium, gallium, selenium, nickel, zinc, and cadmium.   

If we're going to embrace solar I also think we have to demand regulation for the disposal of the panels and make sure we have adequate recycling facilities in place or planned/in construction.  This has already happened in the EU.

These facts are apolitical.

Offline Gordan

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Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2018, 09:21:48 AM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/06/solar-panel-waste-environmental-threat-clean-energy

Read in context. The National Review is a conservative publication, and attacking clean energy fits their political agenda.


That may be so, but it's also important to consider the entire life cycle of a product or system before deciding it is clean.  Or clean enough because nothing is going to be a panacea.  It's not an issue right now because there aren't enough panels hitting end of life yet but that will drastically change in around 15 years when the wave of panels installed in the last decade start reaching their end of life. 

Currently most discarded panels end up in landfill.  Some are recycled, but there is no regulatory requirement to do so.  Unfortunately there isn't much incentive for voluntary recycling because the breakdown products are not very valuable.  Depending on the cell type this can be 76%-89% glass, 7%-8% aluminum, 4-10% polymer, 5% silicon for silicon cells, and very small amounts of silver, tin, lead, copper, indium, gallium, selenium, nickel, zinc, and cadmium.   

If we're going to embrace solar I also think we have to demand regulation for the disposal of the panels and make sure we have adequate recycling facilities in place or planned/in construction.  This has already happened in the EU.

These facts are apolitical.

Yes, I agree with all that. And this is part of how it will grow an economy and create new jobs. Not just focusing on manufacturing and installation but, maybe also with end of life recycling.

The problem I have with the national review is that they look to crap on any ideas of alternatives to fossil fuels. They are not scientists or leaders of industry, not even legitimate journalists. Just more pundits paid off to parrot talking points that were handed to them. And more often than not, steer the conversation back to the old polluting sources of fuel.

One of the larger groups that represents coal reacted to the IPCC report from last week by saying we should rely more in carbon capturing technology. This does not yet exist in a larger commercial capacity. And this is the same industry that recently successfully lobbied our government to peel back regulation regarding mercury in our air because THAT technology (already widely available) was "too expensive".

Coal can be utilized in the extraction of REE (rare earth elements) metals that we need for renewable energy and technology in general. At the moment China has a near global monopoly on these.

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Want to get community solar in Queens?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2018, 09:21:48 AM »