Author Topic: Jackson Heights' Notoriety  (Read 18098 times)

Offline Griswold Girl

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #30 on: August 24, 2008, 05:56:26 PM »
Big business is already here: Dunkin Donuts, Taco Bell, Burger King, Home Depot, Bed Bath and Beyond, Michael's, Kentucky Fried Chicken, White Castle, Wendy's, Rite Aid, CVS etc.. etc...  Those businesses don't come because there is a scene here.

I feel like some chain stores, especially fast food, thrive off of low income individuals and exploit them either through their labor or their health via crappy food at rock bottom prices. I think some professionals moving into the neighborhood would be good to support locally owned businesses and help to create new businesses other than banks and fast food chains.  Glad to see Tomo, glad to see Espresso 77.  Sad to hear that their is a CVS opening up at Northern and 88th (?)  Do we really need another chain drug store?

Offline John Prester

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #31 on: August 24, 2008, 06:36:50 PM »
I hate all those anti trust funders comments which seem like veiled anti-white professionals comments. 

Anti- "Trust funder" comments are indeed silly.  I really don't think anyone with a substantial trust fund would move to Jackson Heights, unless they want to add a few lines to their resume about how they "slummed it" for a couple years.  Funny thing is the yahoos that are most vocal in their anti-gentrification screeds are usually white anyways.

I much rather stay in the neighborhood to do these things rather than go over to (yikes) Astoria or Manhattan.  I think there is room for all things in the neighborhood.

Indeed.  I second that, and "put my money in the neighborhood" as much as possible.  Kazalas Paint Store can thank me for buying several hundred dollars worth of paint there instead of patronizing Home Creepo Depot.  The 2 crummy neighborhood wine shops can also be grateful that I'm a lazy lush, and buy from them when I don't have the time to go to Astor Wines for my weekly fix!

barnes and nobles is supposedly coming, right?
chipotle, applebees, and quiznos is a change I do not look forward to.

For a different perspective on this idea, check out this article in the LA Times about the conflict in Baldwin Park between 3rd and 4th generation Mexican Americans and recent arrivals from Mexico.  The 3rd/4th generation folks actually want such places, and are tired of check cashers, payday loan stores, and 50 stores selling quinceañera dresses, what they refer to as "amigo stores":

"We want what Middle America has as well," said the second-generation Mexican American, recounting the meeting. "We like to go to nice places like Claim Jumpers, Chili's and Applebee's. . . . We don't want the fly-by-night business, the 'amigo store,' which they use to attract Latinos like myself."

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-amigostores28-2008may28,0,982010.story

Big business is already here: Dunkin Donuts, Taco Bell, Burger King, Home Depot, Bed Bath and Beyond, Michael's, Kentucky Fried Chicken, White Castle, Wendy's, Rite Aid, CVS etc.. etc...  Those businesses don't come because there is a scene here.

I feel like some chain stores, especially fast food, thrive off of low income individuals and exploit them either through their labor or their health via crappy food at rock bottom prices.

I don't care for most of those places either, but they generally do their research first, and don't enter a neighborhood unless they are assured of making a profit by fulfilling a need. 

As for chain stores thriving off low income individuals, the recent ban on fast food restaurants in certain LA neighborhoods by the LA City Council comes to mind.  I think there's many underlying unspoken issues involved as well, if you read between the lines in the city council's action, but you won't read about these in the NY Times or "polite media".  Think: health care costs, and also think: nanny state, and the "lords" deciding what's best for those who really can't make proper decisions themselves! 

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/politics/cal/la-me-fastfood30-2008jul30,0,7844906.story
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Offline Griswold Girl

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #32 on: August 24, 2008, 11:12:17 PM »
John Prester-- thanks for the interesting articles.  Yummy food for thought.

Offline eddiestjohns

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #33 on: August 24, 2008, 11:47:07 PM »
John Prestor & Griswold Girl both of you echo most of my sentiments

Offline Jeffsayyes

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2008, 11:52:43 PM »
I don't care which generation wants it, I hate applebees and all of its siblings.

Offline Aronan

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #35 on: August 25, 2008, 09:46:42 AM »
The nice thing about Jackson Heights is there's room enough for the little coffee store that could and the evil coffee corporation. Barnes and Noble can sell their books right next to the Christian book store, Taco Bell can push their sorry excuse for tacos right across the street form Coatzingo if they want.

Jackson Heights is a great place, but I don't think it has the infrastructure to support a complete rebuilding like Williamsburg. Remember before Billysburg was the place to live it was full of factories, warehouses, and industrial buildings. The developers were able to convert all this space into whatever they could and eventually get top (or near top) dollar for it all.

Jackson Heights is a very well established residential neighborhood, complete with an Historic District that makes development very hard. This area is capped at a certain population, that limits the type and size of stores we'll ever see here. Barnes and Noble would already be here if they thought they could make a profit. As it is there's a B&N one stop away on Austin St. in Forrest Hills.

Of all the neighborhoods in NYC that have fallen prey to the evil "G" word, JH is likely to handle it's most recent renaissance with ease. Change is good, most of the time and I don't think we're going to go to sleep in lovely little JH one night and wake up in hipsterland the next morning. 
"It is widely recognized that the courageous spirit of a
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colonialcourter

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #36 on: August 25, 2008, 04:53:52 PM »
Just wanted to chime in...I agree with Griswold Girl and John Prester's opinions as well. I'm closing next week on an apartment, and I'm very excited to move to the neighborhood. Do I have a trust fund? Not even close. I've been saving up for a down payment for 10 years.

Do I hope that JH one day gets a bookstore and bistro? You bet. Do I think JH will turn into Willamsburg? Not so much. But I do think JH will be a very different place 20 years from now. It really is one of the last nice semi-affordable neighborhoods left out there that still has great access to Manhattan. For that reason, I think it will always be an attractive place to live, but I'm also sure it's not going to have an overnight transformation.

Anyway, I've been lurking on this board for about 6 months now, and I'm happy to be a part of a well-articulated discussion such as this one.

Looking forward to more posts.



Offline Griswold Girl

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #37 on: August 25, 2008, 08:17:14 PM »
colonialcourter -- Welcome to the neighborhood.  Yes, I want to keep Indian, Columbian, Peruvian, Pizza Sam, Mexican, Thai, Vietnamese, Tomo, Espresso 77,  and yes, hopefully a bookstore and bistro someday.  No, I don't it want it to be like Williamsburg either.  I burned my trucker hat like so 10 + years ago. 



Offline eddiestjohns

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #38 on: August 25, 2008, 10:34:42 PM »
The nice thing about Jackson Heights is there's room enough for the little coffee store that could and the evil coffee corporation.

Evil coffee corporation ::)?

Offline StevenGrey

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #39 on: August 26, 2008, 02:56:55 PM »
Quote
Of all the neighborhoods in NYC that have fallen prey to the evil "G" word, JH is likely to handle it's most recent renaissance with ease. Change is good, most of the time and I don't think we're going to go to sleep in lovely little JH one night and wake up in hipsterland the next morning.

Why is it that certain people only see "gentrification" as one of society's evils?

Having lived in South Park Slope for a number of years before moving to Jackson Heights, I certainly do NOT feel that way. The gentrification that occurred while I lived in that neighborhood brought vast improvements to the quality of life for everyone living there... cleaner and safer streets, improved city services, higher quality shopping and dining options, and higher property values. I know this last item is the one that usually has all the "bleeding hearts" screaming about people being forced out of the neighborhood, but I simply didn't find that to be the case. Most existing homeowners were happy to sell their property for several times what they had paid, especially when many had done nothing to upkeep or improve their homes over the many years (in some cases, decades) that they had been living there. In virtually every case on my particular block, the new homeowners had to make a significant additional investment in their property (plumbing, electrical, structural, and aesthetic renovations), however, their investment not only increased the value of their property, but all of their neighbors' as well.

[The one significant downside to "gentrification" in this city is the seeming lack of community board oversight when it comes to overzealous developers. I DO believe that a neighborhood's character and architectural heritage need to be preserved, as I've stated in one or two other threads on this bulletin board.]

Offline Aronan

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #40 on: August 26, 2008, 06:48:13 PM »

[The one significant downside to "gentrification" in this city is the seeming lack of community board oversight when it comes to overzealous developers. I DO believe that a neighborhood's character and architectural heritage need to be preserved, as I've stated in one or two other threads on this bulletin board.]


And therein lies the problem with gentrification. There is nothing wrong with neighborhoods developing for the better based in the individual contributions of the owners in that area. However there are cases where developers have gone overboard and pushed out any semblance of a community that was already there. When an area that is largely populated by poorer families in need of schools another community services suddenly becomes a hipster mecca that only trust fund babies or Russian millionaires can afford it's problematic.

The real problem however is perhaps with the word gentrification its self. It would be interesting to explore the roots of the word (any English teachers out there?) as I don't think it was meant to be a positive term. Community development, renaissance, chage etc. good terms gentrification seems to have a negative connotation.
"It is widely recognized that the courageous spirit of a
single man can inspire to victory an army of
thousands. If one concerned with ordinary gain can
create such an effect, how much more will be produced by one who cares for greater things ?" -Chunag Tse

Offline eddiestjohns

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #41 on: August 26, 2008, 08:42:38 PM »
When an area that is largely populated by poorer families in need of schools another community services suddenly becomes a hipster mecca that only trust fund babies or Russian millionaires can afford it's problematic.


Russian millionaires? Elaborate.

Offline Shelby2

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Offline John Prester

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #43 on: August 27, 2008, 09:12:20 AM »
You're Not Imagining that Russian Buying Spree

No need for Jackson Heights to worry:

"A few years ago we didn't see any Russians," Mr. Willkie says. "But now, especially at the high end of the market they are buying big apartments...so they are a significant factor."
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Offline Aronan

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Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2008, 10:17:06 AM »
Once upon a time Jackson Heights was a pretty Russian Neighborhood. But yes, no need to worry now, the millionaires won't be buying here . :)
"It is widely recognized that the courageous spirit of a
single man can inspire to victory an army of
thousands. If one concerned with ordinary gain can
create such an effect, how much more will be produced by one who cares for greater things ?" -Chunag Tse

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Jackson Heights' Notoriety
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2008, 10:17:06 AM »