Author Topic: Food Nations of Jackson Heights  (Read 4912 times)

Offline Jeffsayyes

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Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2016, 11:02:45 AM »
For Bhutanese, there is Ema Dhatse on Woodside Ave / 68th... not sure if that falls within the boundaries. There is another one further down. I'm not sure if any of the owners here are bhutanese.


Why are Lali Guras, Dhaka Garden, Phayul, Kababish questioned? I think they are all pretty true.


----what places could be considered the most indicative of those countries, in menu, spirit and perhaps clientele?----
[/size]what places could be considered the most indicative of those countries, in menu, spirit and perhaps clientele?
I really think this the crux for what is considered "authentic".... It's such a loaded term, you really have to be careful when using it. Does the flavor on the plate make it authentic? Maybe if you are a homecook, yeah, but I think that authenticity is the whole world of the place. Not just the food, but the people. Also, the food always changes. People have to make the distinction between authentic and traditional --- two very different things.

Offline toddg

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Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2016, 07:52:29 AM »
Markie B's Jamaican Cuisine, 32-23 Junction Blvd

Offline Palermo

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Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2016, 11:48:54 AM »
Oh i wasn't questioning them per se, its just that my knowledge of south asian food is very limited, so I was just trying to gather opinions. 

I'd agree that "authentic" is a loaded term, so that's why I didn't use it.  What even is authentic?  You'd be hard pressed to find an Italian restaurant around here which can be found outside the tourist areas in Italy.  Heck, even lumping all of India into a single slot isn't fair.  It's a huge country and maybe Dravidian food is as different from Punjabi food as Sicilian is to Emilia-Romanan. 

Offline JDinJH

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Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2016, 09:48:51 PM »
This is the best post ever!  I saw it when it first come out and I still refer to it when I need a little inspiration. 

Offline JHMNY

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Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2018, 01:27:48 PM »
This is an older thread, but definitely worth reviving. I was disappointed recently to find out that the Ecuadorean restaurant, La Picada Azuaya has closed. Apart from my mom's cooking, this was my go-to place for an Ecuadorean fix, sit-down style. The local food carts are great, but sometimes a restaurant is what's called for, particularly when dining with friends and family. Hornado Ecuatoriano over on Roosevelt is good for its signature dish, roast pork, but I have yet to try something else from the menu. Has anyone tried Barzola?  I think it's located on 92nd and 37th Ave.

Jackson Heights Life

Re: Food Nations of Jackson Heights
« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2018, 01:27:48 PM »