Author Topic: JH Watches Military Tension in South America  (Read 1777 times)

Offline toddg

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JH Watches Military Tension in South America
« on: March 04, 2008, 08:49:57 AM »
The New York Sun
Queens Enclave Roiled by News From S. America
By SARAH GARLAND
March 4, 2008

In Queens, just as in South America, Ecuadorians, Venezuelans, and Colombians have settled as close neighbors who tend to enjoy each other's company as much as each other's arepas.

Now a conflict back home has some worried that those bonds could be strained, as neighborhoods such as Corona and Jackson Heights are gripped by news of military maneuvering along the shared borders of the three countries.

Yesterday, televisions tuned to Spanish-language news turned the heads of customers filing in and out of the bakeries and rotisserie chicken joints lining 37th Avenue. Regular updates on the conflict, accompanied by photos of arms caches and marching troops, fed chatter in the South American enclave about whether President Uribe of Colombia had gone too far in sending forces to battle rebel forces in Ecuador, or whether President Chavez of Venezuela and President Correa of Ecuador had overreacted by sending troops to their borders with Colombia.

(Follow link above for complete article)


Colombians at the Pollos A la Brasa Mario restaurant in Jackson Heights watch news coverage of the Colombian army’s incursion into Ecuador yesterday afternoon.  Photo by Konrad Fiedler.

Offline toddg

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Re: JH Watches Military Tension in South America
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2008, 12:31:49 AM »
Great article if you want to learn more about this conflict and how it is affecting our neighborhood...

The New York Times
In Queens, No Breach of an Ecuadorean-Colombian Border
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and ANNIE CORREAL
Published: March 9, 2008

The Colombian military raid in Ecuador that sparked a South American crisis between Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela played out on an international stage last week. But another world away, in the Roosevelt Shopping Center in Jackson Heights, Queens, the crisis reverberated on a smaller scale, at Orlando Travel and the House of Cards.

Orlando Travel is the cramped two-room headquarters of Orlando Tobón, a 60-year-old native of Cisneros, Colombia, who helps Colombian immigrants find jobs and housing and who is known in Jackson Heights as the mayor of Little Colombia. The House of Cards, or La Casa de las Tarjetas, is an equally cramped wedding and party supply store run by Bolivar Coba, 56, and his wife, Nancy Coba Madero, 50, both from Quito, Ecuador.

One empty storefront inside the shopping center separates Mr. Tobón and Mr. Coba, but the gulf between their views of the crisis is far wider. Mr. Tobón said he supported President Álvaro Uribe of Colombia for raiding a rebel camp on March 1, though that camp was about a mile inside Ecuador. Mr. Coba said he agreed with President Rafael Correa of Ecuador for denouncing Colombia’s actions.

Mr. Tobón, sitting behind a desk flanked by boxes of paper and envelopes, said: “Uribe has transformed Colombia, or made it into what it was before, and for that, he deserves our respect.” Mr. Coba, standing in his store among tiaras, silk dresses and boxes of invitations, said: “This problem arose from a violation of a country’s sovereignty. If that is respected, there is no problem.”

Mr. Tobón and Mr. Coba illustrated the close-range contact and wide-ranging opinions about the dispute among New York City’s 278,000 Colombians, Ecuadoreans and Venezuelans. In the bakeries, travel agencies and cafes of Jackson Heights, home to large numbers of Colombians but also some Ecuadoreans and Venezuelans, people from the three countries were drawn into a passionate debate about national sovereignty and Colombia’s war with rebels, which has gone on for decades.

(Follow link for complete article)

Offline Chuckster

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Re: JH Watches Military Tension in South America
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2008, 05:47:11 PM »
Thanks for posting Todd.  My dad spends a lot of time hanging out at the larger Delgado on Roosevelt.  He's a very social guy, so he views it as somewhat of a community forum.  He buys his newspapers there, makes phone calls to family, lounges while watching futbol games and enjoys good conversation with fellow Ecuadoreans.  He did happen to mention that during the conflict between Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, conversations got rather heated and divisive when when attempting to discuss the issue with other South Americans.  He tells me that these types of reactions are pretty much the norm when discussing politics in general, and that although there may be differing opinions, most everyone is respectful of opposing views.

The Chuckster has spoken!

Offline Chuckster

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Another issue affecting Ecuador -- massive flooding
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2008, 10:36:48 PM »
Here's information on another issue affecting Ecuador.  Like the article states, this problem is caused by torrential downpours that have drastically affected plantations and many small towns throughout the country.

http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/columnists/ruiz/index.html



The Chuckster has spoken!

Jackson Heights Life

Another issue affecting Ecuador -- massive flooding
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2008, 10:36:48 PM »