Author Topic: The development threat facing Jackson Heights is greater than we thought  (Read 8968 times)

Offline abcdefghijk

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I imagine those foot traffic numbers also indicate that Jackson Heights is an immigrant hub.

In other words, folks from the surrounding neighborhoods of Elmhurst, Woodside and Corona  (and even further afield) gather here because of the familiarity of the immigrant stores and restaurants that exist here. Catering to specific cultural needs.

Plus it's easy to get to Jackson Heights, transit-wise.

I would guess that many counted in that data don't live in Jackson Heights but rather within a few miles of Jackson Heights.

Much like how young folks gather in the Lower East Side/East Village but don't necessarily live there. The stores/cafes/bars cater to the young there.  But young folks are attracted from further afield (like Brooklyn or even Jackson Heights!)...

 
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 10:59:02 AM by abcdefghijk »

Offline Shelby2

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I imagine those foot traffic numbers also indicate that Jackson Heights is an immigrant hub.

In other words, folks from the surrounding neighborhoods of Elmhurst, Woodside and Corona  (and even further afield) gather here because of the familiarity of the immigrant stores and restaurants that exist here. Catering to specific cultural needs.

Plus it's easy to get to Jackson Heights, transit-wise.

I would guess that many counted in that data don't live in Jackson Heights but rather within a few miles of Jackson Heights.

Much like how young folks gather in the Lower East Side/East Village but don't necessarily live there. The stores/cafes/bars cater to the young there.  But young folks are attracted from further afield (like Brooklyn or even Jackson Heights!)...

That doesn't explain why the numbers doubled in 10 years. It was the same immigrant hub with most of the same amenities 10 years ago.


Offline abcdefghijk

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I believe the Bengali/Bangladeshi community has grown in that time.

And Jackson Heights is now the center for Bangladeshi immigrants.

Prior to that it was Indian...but I believe the Indian influence has decreased as the Bangladeshi one has increased.

An Indian pal explained to me that many (not all) of the stores in Little India are now run by Bangladeshi folk.  So the term "Little India" should in truth really be "Little Bangladesh" nowadays.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 11:23:50 AM by abcdefghijk »

Offline abcdefghijk

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From wikipedia...

New York City is home to the largest Bangladeshi community in the United States, receiving by far the highest legal permanent resident Bangladeshi immigrant population.[2] The Bangladeshi-born immigrant population has become one of the fastest growing in New York City, counting over 74,000 by 2011 alone.[10][11] The city's Bangladeshi community is spread out in the Jackson Heights neighbourhood within the New York City borough of Queens. 74th Street has most of the Bangladeshi grocery stores and clothing stores in Jackson Heights. The Bangladesh Plaza hosts numerous Bangladeshi businesses and cultural events. Recently, one part of Jackson Heights has become the open platform of all sorts of protests and activism. The neighbouring communities of Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Elmhurst in Queens also similarly have become attractive areas to live for Bangladeshi Americans.

Offline CaptainFlannel

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This whole argument of there being too many residents in Jackson Heights on sidewalks to walk is pretty silly.

There is a difference between a silly argument and one you don't agree with. I advise learning the difference so as to not insult people you disagree with.

Offline Shelby2

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From wikipedia...

New York City is home to the largest Bangladeshi community in the United States, receiving by far the highest legal permanent resident Bangladeshi immigrant population.[2] The Bangladeshi-born immigrant population has become one of the fastest growing in New York City, counting over 74,000 by 2011 alone.[10][11] The city's Bangladeshi community is spread out in the Jackson Heights neighbourhood within the New York City borough of Queens. 74th Street has most of the Bangladeshi grocery stores and clothing stores in Jackson Heights. The Bangladesh Plaza hosts numerous Bangladeshi businesses and cultural events. Recently, one part of Jackson Heights has become the open platform of all sorts of protests and activism. The neighbouring communities of Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Elmhurst in Queens also similarly have become attractive areas to live for Bangladeshi Americans.

Still doesn't explain why pedestrian traffic has doubled on 82nd St. between Roosevelt and 37th. Granted, I don't know the country of origin for every person I pass, but it doesn't seem like 82nd St. has many Bangladeshis on it.

Offline abcdefghijk

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I once heard that Jackson Heights is like a port.

New immigrants know to come here and get a foothold in NYC.

(Like the Lower East Side was in the Ellis Island days)

That documentary IN JACKSON HEIGHTS pretty much illustrates it.

Those foot traffic numbers must be a mix of new immigrants and visitors.





« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 12:29:25 PM by abcdefghijk »

Offline Lilybell

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This whole argument of there being too many residents in Jackson Heights on sidewalks to walk is pretty silly.

We really need that "ignore" button that allows us to block seeing comments from posters who can't be civil.

Offline lmaniace

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More foot traffic on one commercial street leading to the subway is generally a healthy sign, because it's good for business and safety. I don't find the streets unpleasantly crowded, but that's me. 
The question is why the increase?
Don't think we've had a significant population increase because not really any new housing  There's been an increase at 73rd and Broadway as well, but not as great.
Some possibilities more people being attracted to stores on 82nd, more people walking down this part of 82nd to go to the other side of Roosevelt; more people living here using transit, more people visiting/working in JH using transit .
In any case, JH is a great neighborhood to walk in. Take advantage of that this weekend for JHBG's Historic Weekend events.
And sign a postcard to extend the historic district while you're at it; they are available in several stores.

Offline JK resident

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The answer is that many people rent a two bedroom and have eight people living in one apartment. The landlord pays the water and hot water so who cares. I have visited many homes and apartments in the neighborhood and many people live in appalling conditions. These many people in one apartment tends to degrade the housing rapidly. I have heard horror stories from repair people and supers. Many people from third world countries are used to living in squalor. Our schools are at overcapacity. Even though we have built many schools they continue to be overcrowded.


https://jacksonheightspost.com/corona-and-neighboring-areas-are-most-crowded-in-nyc

Offline Shelby2

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The answer is that many people rent a two bedroom and have eight people living in one apartment. The landlord pays the water and hot water so who cares. I have visited many homes and apartments in the neighborhood and many people live in appalling conditions. These many people in one apartment tends to degrade the housing rapidly. I have heard horror stories from repair people and supers. Many people from third world countries are used to living in squalor. Our schools are at overcapacity. Even though we have built many schools they continue to be overcrowded.


https://jacksonheightspost.com/corona-and-neighboring-areas-are-most-crowded-in-nyc

Then it seems that as far as crowded streets and infrastructure goes, we would have plenty of room for new development as long as the city would crack down on illegal dwellings.

Offline lmaniace

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... and builds a new East River tunnel and four track subway to serve transit-starved Queens; a sizable local park, more schools... and as long as the new construction is in character with the surrounding neighborhood, maintaining our garden city plan... after all we are already one of NYC's densest neighborhoods.
So folks don't forget to continue to write the LPC urging them to move forward with a hearing on expanding JH's Historic District. See first post on how to do that and check out our wonderful video.
https://vimeo.com/270862267




Offline JK resident

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With CBTC control of all our trains soon the MTA will be able to expand capacity dramatically without building a new tunnel. The 7 line will get it later this year with the Queens Blvd line next. Technology to the rescue. Now if we only get our pampered MTA contractors to perform the work on time and under budget.

The more I read about this Historic district and the need to control density and views and air, the more it seems apparent that is NIMBY’ism on steroids. A group of well off white people wanting to stop multiple family construction in order to limit young immigrant families from living in spacious new apartments that have modern fire control equipment. The whole idea that the new construction is of poor quality while being highly regulated is laughable. The city should crack down on these illegal basements and attics so these immigrants aren’t exploited by the unscrupulous landlords.

https://youtu.be/_1Bgmugve5M

Offline lmaniace

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JK resident,
You don't have to support the extension of the landmark district, but at least be fair.
Suggesting that these new big buildings are going to house immigrant families is fantasy; they are being built for affluent people regardless of where they come from. In fact the new buildings are more likely to replace rental apartments where immigrant families live - and trigger a wave of gentrification.
You are trying to slime supporters of the landmark expansion by saying we are white affluent people trying to keep immigrant families out of new housing. JHBG, an all-volunteer organization, has long been a champion of a diverse community and we provide programs for all of our people, regardless of ethnicity, language, income, sexuality and age. Have you seen the cross section of our community who participates in our Halloween Parade, Summer Sundays in the Park, our student art contest, our volunteers greening programs, who it is that plays in Travers Park where we have worked for nearly 30 years to improve?
Instead you call us anti-immigrant, apparently including those of us who came from other countries or whose parents came from other countries. It's an old trick and you aren't fooling anyone.
Our members, supporters and volunteers, including those backing the landmark extension, reflect all who live in JH. We are working people whose kids go to public schools. Clearly you don't know who we are and you don't care who our programs serve, but that doesn't stop you from spouting off. I'd offer to sit down with you to discuss this matter, but you seem intent on demonizing those who disagree with you.
All the best.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 11:05:47 PM by lmaniace »

Offline JK resident

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New housing is being all over LIC and Astoria were the city sets aside as a condition to receive bonds and tax abatements a certain number of apartments for people of middle and low income. They also take account of family size. If you expand the historic district the current low density areas of Jackson Heights will be practically off limits for development. It will be impossible to demolish any of the existing structures. This will drive up the value of existing housing because no new housing will ever be allowed. This is why in Manhattan there is no construction in historic districts. If you feel the current zoning allows out of scale development then you should push to make all zoning contextual (ie R7 to R7A). This would provide more front gardens and setbacks.

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