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21
Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by lalochezia on Yesterday at 01:54:33 PM »
  Many causes of congestion are the existence of bike lanes that are unoccupied for what appears to be over 80% of the time and serve little more than to take away a lane of traffic from other motorized vehicles. 

Other "causes of congestion" include sidewalks, apartments, houses and parks. There are potential lanes for cars there! Get rid of them all!

Note: building more lanes for private automobile traffic does very little to solve congestion in anything other than the shortest of short terms. Traffic flows expand to the space given to it. You have to dis-incentivize car use, and incentivize other travel modes otherwise we are on a one-way ticket to gridlock (in cities) and climate-change induced ecocide (everywhere).


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The crime stats are just as bad, for the most part, in the 115th pct.
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by Alfster on Yesterday at 12:13:39 PM »
There are very few poor people driving cars? There are a lot of people in JH that have cars that are worth less than $3000. Having a car is a very real need for many elderly and disabled people. These people can’t use mass transit because most stops are not ADA. Congestion pricing would just prevent these people having access to the best hospitals in the national unless you pay the tax. Sounds unfair to me.

I agree.  Congestion Pricing is a horrible idea.  Many causes of congestion are the existence of bike lanes that are unoccupied for what appears to be over 80% of the time and serve little more than to take away a lane of traffic from other motorized vehicles.  "Congestion Pricing" is just a cash grab by the city upon the already heavily taxed driver.
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Real Estate & Home Improvement / Re: Looking to buy 1BR Condo--CASH
« Last post by lalochezia on Yesterday at 12:10:10 PM »
Remember: condos cost more because they are more fungible (i.e. easier to sell to anyone, and often easier to sublet/rent). Thus you're competing with people who want to buy it for an investment, not just as a home.

A co-op as a place to live is a great idea, if managed well; indeed this is one of the reasons the co-op structure was set up.
 As a fungible asset, not so much, since the sale depends heavily on the board interview; the board can prevent or make renting difficult too; this makes them less attractive as investments, lowering the price, which is great if you want to buy & live in one!
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by JK resident on Yesterday at 12:08:07 PM »
There are very few poor people driving cars? There are a lot of people in JH that have cars that are worth less than $3000. Having a car is a very real need for many elderly and disabled people. These people can’t use mass transit because most stops are not ADA. Congestion pricing would just prevent these people having access to the best hospitals in the national unless you pay the tax. Sounds unfair to me.
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by dssjh on Yesterday at 11:40:43 AM »
it's worked in other places, and it didn't end civilization in those places. i'm a non-driver, so my two cents may not be worth two cents, but i think it's reasonable. it's not terribly regressive (very few very poor people drive around ny) and it could be tweaked to accommodate professional drivers.

remember, the smoking ban was going to force 33 percent of all bars in nyc to shutter permanently if put into place....
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by jh35 on Yesterday at 11:39:36 AM »
From the Jackson Heights Post:

Transportation Lobby Group Calls on Legislature to Pass Congestion Pricing, Says It Will Reduce Northern Blvd Traffic

A local advocacy group is holding a rally next week on Northern Boulevard to announce its support for congestion pricing.

Make Queens Safer, a group that advocates for roadway safety, is calling on the state legislature to back congestion pricing arguing that it will help reduce traffic on Northern Boulevard and thereby deaths.

The group says that many drivers use Northern Boulevard in order to get to Manhattan via the toll-free crossing at the Queensboro Bridge—as opposed to using other East River crossings since they have tolls.

The group argues that with congestion pricing all drivers would have to pay to go into Manhattan south of 60th Street, making the Northern Boulevard corridor less advantageous and therefore less trafficked.

Drivers who use the MTA-tolled access points—such as the Queens-Midown tunnel– would be credited upon going below 60th Street providing price equity. Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his state of the state speech on Tuesday, called on the legislature to pass the plan.

The rally, which will take place on Jan. 24 at 8:15 a.m., will be held at 80th Street and Northern Boulevard, where Miguel Torres, an 11-year-old boy, was fatally struck by a dump truck on his way to school at I.S. 145 school in December 2012.

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Wouldn't it be simpler to put a toll on the 59th street bridge?
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Neighborhood Chat / Congestion Pricing
« Last post by JHMNY on Yesterday at 11:09:11 AM »
From the Jackson Heights Post:

Transportation Lobby Group Calls on Legislature to Pass Congestion Pricing, Says It Will Reduce Northern Blvd Traffic

A local advocacy group is holding a rally next week on Northern Boulevard to announce its support for congestion pricing.

Make Queens Safer, a group that advocates for roadway safety, is calling on the state legislature to back congestion pricing arguing that it will help reduce traffic on Northern Boulevard and thereby deaths.

The group says that many drivers use Northern Boulevard in order to get to Manhattan via the toll-free crossing at the Queensboro Bridge—as opposed to using other East River crossings since they have tolls.

The group argues that with congestion pricing all drivers would have to pay to go into Manhattan south of 60th Street, making the Northern Boulevard corridor less advantageous and therefore less trafficked.

Drivers who use the MTA-tolled access points—such as the Queens-Midown tunnel– would be credited upon going below 60th Street providing price equity. Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his state of the state speech on Tuesday, called on the legislature to pass the plan.

The rally, which will take place on Jan. 24 at 8:15 a.m., will be held at 80th Street and Northern Boulevard, where Miguel Torres, an 11-year-old boy, was fatally struck by a dump truck on his way to school at I.S. 145 school in December 2012.


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Real Estate & Home Improvement / Re: Looking to buy 1BR Condo--CASH
« Last post by rhydewithdis on Yesterday at 10:55:50 AM »
Hello Shelby2 and Carrefour_NY,

Thank you for your responses.  Yes, I do see on StreetEasy the inventory for condos in JH is significantly smaller and their prices higher compared to co-ops.  I had lived in a JH co-op for many years, and it was a terrible experience.  Thus, I prefer a condo because of the free and clear ownership and the lower monthly common charges.  Hoping to find one seeking a quick sale via a cash transaction. 

Regards,
Dawn

While condos generally have lower common charges, you also have to pay RE taxes monthly. When combined those two are usually higher than a CO-OP maintenance fee which is all inclusive. Also a lot of condos are newer and tenants pay their own heat which can be really expensive.

All in all co-ops are much cheaper both in cost and monthly. I don't think you can find a condo here for $300k.

1 bedroom condos in the Historic District (and let's include the Andrew Jackson bldg on Leverich St. in the mix as well) will start at $450k+ for a unit needing a full rehab. $500k+ for a renovated unit. You might be able to snag a deal on an estate deal if you can get an in and buy something off-market. My suggestion - if you REALLY want to find a deal is to send an unsolicited mailing to EVERY unit in the condo buildings offering to buy their place. Do this 4x a year and you might get a couple of promising leads. It shouldn't cost you more than $250 in stamps and envelopes and you could save a $100k if it works out.

There are a number of coop buildings in Jackson Heights without any underlying mortgages on the buildings and healthy reserves - remember we are talking about buildings that are built in the 1920's! Those buildings tend to have lower than average monthlies but higher than average sales prices.
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Real Estate & Home Improvement / Re: Washington Plaza
« Last post by Simka on Yesterday at 10:30:11 AM »
Hello residents of Washington Plaza! My partner and I are excited to be joining the coop. We chose this building in part because of the community it promises. In the past few months, we have charted the conversation on this thread as it has evolved since 29 March 2016, noting the range of personalities as well as the many questions and responses. Indeed, we are optimistic about the future of the cooperative because of the commitment and engagement of the people who call it home.

I am writing now in the event that others have questions about the purchasing process. I am happy to share my experience and insights. Likewise, if there is a closed forum for residents, I would greatly appreciate an invitation given that my questions and wonderings will likely change as a resident and coop member. I am looking forward to a new chapter, especially as Washington Plaza moves closer to self-governance. Thank you!

Hi, Jh2019. I'm a renter at Washington Plaza, so I'm not involved as a coop member. But our issues and concerns do overlap quite a bit. I hope you enjoy living here!
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