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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by toddg on Yesterday at 09:06:40 PM »
One of my favorite topics!   If anybody is nostalgic for our earlier debates on congestion pricing, they can be found here and here.

Just to respond quickly to some of the objections raised today:

1. There will be no toll booths
2. In most of the proposals, there will be new tolls imposed at the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg, and Queensboro Bridges, plus all of the avenues just above 60th Street.
3. While the proposal is being called "congestion pricing" by New York politicians and the press, that's not really the proposal on the table.  Congestion tolls tend to be targeted at congested hours, and their purpose is the shift traveler behavior.  This proposal is really just a "cordon toll" aimed at raising revenue.
4. Yes, this is a "money grab" -- that's the point.  The purpose is to raise funds for repairs and upgrades to the transit system.  The alternatives are to allow the system to tailspin into further decline, or to raise everyone's taxes.  The idea of supplementing the existing tax subsidies with tolls paid by drivers entering the central business district is good public policy and socially equitable.
5. This is being proposed by the Governor and considered for approval by the state legislature.  The current Mayor has never really endorsed the idea, and in the past has strongly opposed it.
6. There was terrible traffic congestion in Manhattan (much worse than today, by some accounts) long before there were bike lanes.   Remember the years when "gridlock," real traffic paralysis, was a frequent occurrence on city streets?
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by jh35 on Yesterday at 08:08:19 PM »
From the Jackson Heights Post:

Transportation Lobby Group Calls on Legislature to Pass Congestion Pricing, Says It Will Reduce Northern Blvd Traffic

A local advocacy group is holding a rally next week on Northern Boulevard to announce its support for congestion pricing.

Make Queens Safer, a group that advocates for roadway safety, is calling on the state legislature to back congestion pricing arguing that it will help reduce traffic on Northern Boulevard and thereby deaths.

The group says that many drivers use Northern Boulevard in order to get to Manhattan via the toll-free crossing at the Queensboro Bridge—as opposed to using other East River crossings since they have tolls.

The group argues that with congestion pricing all drivers would have to pay to go into Manhattan south of 60th Street, making the Northern Boulevard corridor less advantageous and therefore less trafficked.

Drivers who use the MTA-tolled access points—such as the Queens-Midown tunnel– would be credited upon going below 60th Street providing price equity. Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his state of the state speech on Tuesday, called on the legislature to pass the plan.

The rally, which will take place on Jan. 24 at 8:15 a.m., will be held at 80th Street and Northern Boulevard, where Miguel Torres, an 11-year-old boy, was fatally struck by a dump truck on his way to school at I.S. 145 school in December 2012.

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Wouldn't it be simpler to put a toll on the 59th street bridge?

Please no.. toll booths bottleneck traffic.

Even with EZ-pass where you just drive over a sensor?
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by hfm on Yesterday at 08:04:36 PM »
From the Jackson Heights Post:

Transportation Lobby Group Calls on Legislature to Pass Congestion Pricing, Says It Will Reduce Northern Blvd Traffic

A local advocacy group is holding a rally next week on Northern Boulevard to announce its support for congestion pricing.

Make Queens Safer, a group that advocates for roadway safety, is calling on the state legislature to back congestion pricing arguing that it will help reduce traffic on Northern Boulevard and thereby deaths.

The group says that many drivers use Northern Boulevard in order to get to Manhattan via the toll-free crossing at the Queensboro Bridge—as opposed to using other East River crossings since they have tolls.

The group argues that with congestion pricing all drivers would have to pay to go into Manhattan south of 60th Street, making the Northern Boulevard corridor less advantageous and therefore less trafficked.

Drivers who use the MTA-tolled access points—such as the Queens-Midown tunnel– would be credited upon going below 60th Street providing price equity. Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his state of the state speech on Tuesday, called on the legislature to pass the plan.

The rally, which will take place on Jan. 24 at 8:15 a.m., will be held at 80th Street and Northern Boulevard, where Miguel Torres, an 11-year-old boy, was fatally struck by a dump truck on his way to school at I.S. 145 school in December 2012.

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Wouldn't it be simpler to put a toll on the 59th street bridge?

Please no.. toll booths bottleneck traffic.
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by jh35 on Yesterday at 07:54:12 PM »
there are no tolls on the Brooklyn, Manhattan or Williamsburg bridges.
oh, duh
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by dssjh on Yesterday at 07:48:03 PM »
there are no tolls on the Brooklyn, Manhattan or Williamsburg bridges.
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by jh35 on Yesterday at 07:40:23 PM »
Congestion charging has been in place in London for about 15 years now and after operating costs it raises around 172 million pounds a year which has to be invested in transport. It reduced car use by 10%. Oh and disabled people are exempt from the charge. At first there was a huge outcry but people accepted it and now it’s seen as a necessary part of city life. Something has to be done about that transport in New York so I say bring it on.

Since, except for the 59th street bridge and a couple of tiny bridges in the Bronx, people are pay tolls to enter Manhattan, aren't they already paying congestion pricing?
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by Olivesta on Yesterday at 06:54:30 PM »
Congestion charging has been in place in London for about 15 years now and after operating costs it raises around 172 million pounds a year which has to be invested in transport. It reduced car use by 10%. Oh and disabled people are exempt from the charge. At first there was a huge outcry but people accepted it and now it’s seen as a necessary part of city life. Something has to be done about that transport in New York so I say bring it on.
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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Congestion Pricing
« Last post by jaxheightzforall on Yesterday at 06:31:20 PM »
There are very few poor people driving cars? There are a lot of people in JH that have cars that are worth less than $3000. Having a car is a very real need for many elderly and disabled people. These people can’t use mass transit because most stops are not ADA. Congestion pricing would just prevent these people having access to the best hospitals in the national unless you pay the tax. Sounds unfair to me.

I agree.  Congestion Pricing is a horrible idea.  Many causes of congestion are the existence of bike lanes that are unoccupied for what appears to be over 80% of the time and serve little more than to take away a lane of traffic from other motorized vehicles.  "Congestion Pricing" is just a cash grab by the city upon the already heavily taxed driver.

Alfster you hit the nail on the head!!! I have never seen such poor use of logic and money turning so many roads across Queens (and around the city) into single lane traffic because of bike lanes. Bicycle lanes are not used in inclement weather or winter (several months of the year). It is a terrible waste of resources for the advantage of very few people.

I won't comment on how many bicyclists I see running red lights/ violating traffic laws every single day and causing accidents or near serious accidents as that is an entirely different topic.

I firmly disagree with congestion pricing. Congestion pricing will be most heavily felt by small business owners who DO NOT HAVE A CHOICE or option to avoid driving into Manhattan. I must comment that Commercial parking fees in the city have increased from $16 for 3 hours to $22 hours. And guess what, NO ONE ever comments about it. However, if the MTA dares to increase a small amount everyone is up in arms. People who are supporting congestion pricing are HURTING small businesses (unless necessary provisions are made for commercial vehicles).

As someone who drives into the city every single day, I am under no illusion that adding a toll to the 59th street bridge is going to reduce and/or stop traffic on Northern Boulevard. Do the people organizing this misguided rally actually drive across the 59th street bridge or the midtown tunnel or the JFK bridge as part of their daily lives? Guess what, all of them are completely congested. This is not the solution they are looking for to achieve their goal.

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Neighborhood Chat / Re: Two Willets Point Proposals
« Last post by JK resident on Yesterday at 06:21:41 PM »
The city already has installed new sewer and water lines but does not allow existing businesses to hook up to them. I think allowing schools and housing is not a good use of that valuable land next to a new Airtrain. Probably a hotel and soccer stadium would be acceptable. The city will push for housing which needs police,fire and schools. I can’t imagine that.
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Neighborhood Chat / Two Willets Point Proposals
« Last post by dssjh on Yesterday at 06:12:59 PM »
these were released today.

one includes a soccer stadium -- which will probably be paid for by taxpayers, i'd guess -- and one has a lot of residential components.

haven't digested the concepts, really, but it would take a LOT of infrastucture work to make residential use feasible (there's almost no real sewer/water there, among other things).

any thoughts?

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/real-estate/city-releases-two-willets-point-proposals?utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190117&utm_content=hero-readmore
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