Jackson Heights Life

Get Connected => Neighborhood Chat => Topic started by: dssjh on July 10, 2019, 02:41:57 PM

Title: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 10, 2019, 02:41:57 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/10/us/politics/amazon-housing-northern-virginia.html?searchResultPosition=1

Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 10, 2019, 02:57:25 PM
LIC became unaffordable 15 years ago already. And remains unaffordable. Whether Amazon is there or not.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 10, 2019, 03:26:43 PM
LIC became unaffordable 15 years ago already. And remains unaffordable. Whether Amazon is there or not.

so rather than try to put out a fire, we should pour on flammable liquid to make it worse?
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 10, 2019, 03:45:13 PM
LIC became unaffordable 15 years ago already. And remains unaffordable. Whether Amazon is there or not.

so rather than try to put out a fire, we should pour on flammable liquid to make it worse?

LIC is already for the rich. Amazon or not. It can't get worse.

The rich need somewhere to live. I believe that 20 years ago LIC was zoned for them. 20 years ago!

LIC is almost the price of Williamsburg. And has been for years.

Some areas are simply for the rich.  This happens in every city on the planet.

Again, it happened in LIC years ago.

Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: theplanesland on July 11, 2019, 08:06:56 AM
I went to a concert a few weeks ago with a band from Seattle. They said, "hey Queens, you really dodged a bullet."

I'd listen to the folks who have already been Amazon-ed. They seem to regret it.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: Jhx on July 11, 2019, 09:07:21 AM
Because some no-name bandmember predicted we dodged a bullet. Sure that explains it
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: theplanesland on July 11, 2019, 09:34:13 AM
Because some no-name bandmember predicted we dodged a bullet. Sure that explains it

It was Ben Gibbard from Death Cab for Cutie. They're sort of a Seattle icon.

And right on cue ...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/10/us/politics/amazon-housing-northern-virginia.html
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: KGDHP on July 11, 2019, 09:43:35 AM
But, you know, then there's this:
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/11/amazon-plans-to-spend-700-million-to-retrain-a-third-of-its-workforce-in-new-skills-wsj.html

Say what you will. I'm of the strong belief that this was a missed opportunity for us and helping to develop a better future for the next generation. Literally, as predicted, Plaxall has filed to build luxury condos around the Basin.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 11, 2019, 10:12:18 AM


Say what you will. I'm of the strong belief that this was a missed opportunity for us and helping to develop a better future for the next generation. Literally, as predicted, Plaxall has filed to build luxury condos around the Basin.

Yes. Because LIC is for the rich. Amazon or not.  It's already full of luxury apartments. Has been for years.

A pal from Seattle came to visit me last year. He told me that yes Amazon has changed Seattle. But that Seattle was nowhere near as developed (or big) as Queens or NYC.

Extrapolating from the case in small town single industry Seattle to GIANT MULTI-INDUSTRY NYC is simply not a correct predictor.

NYC is dynamic and changing and resourceful. On a world stage. And is way greater and grander than any single industry.

The numbers that were spoken about are a touch more than the size of LaGuardia College campus students.

Queens would've absorbed that number and barely noticed.

Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 11, 2019, 10:25:34 AM
 ::)
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JH3525 on July 11, 2019, 10:32:28 AM
This morning Amazon became the second company in the World to reach a Market Cap (outstanding shares x price) of $1 Trillion Dollars when the price reached $2,031.28.  The largest is Microsoft with a Market Cap of $1.1 Trillion Dollars but this will be short lived.  By the end of the year Amazon has the potential to be the largest company with Microsoft being second and Apple being third. 
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jh35 on July 11, 2019, 10:34:08 AM

https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-york-city-real-estate-savors-a-tech-boom-11562760760?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=1
 (https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-york-city-real-estate-savors-a-tech-boom-11562760760?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=1)

Wall Street Journal

U.S. Edition

July 11, 2019

Who Needs Amazon HQ2? Not New York Real Estate’s Tech Boom
Facebook, Google, Uber and Amazon embrace Manhattan as an East Coast hub


By
Keiko Morris
Updated July 10, 2019 2:26 pm ET

Big technology companies are doubling down on New York City by adding millions of square feet in office space and creating thousands of new jobs, with few aftereffects from Amazon.com Inc. ’s nixing of a Queens headquarters.

Alphabet Inc. ’s Google last week closed a deal to lease 1.3 million square feet in lower Manhattan, part of Google’s plans to add 7,000 in staff to the city over 10 years.

Facebook Inc. is in talks to lease one million square feet of office space at 50 Hudson Yards, a skyscraper under construction on Manhattan’s far West Side, according to a person familiar with the talks. Uber Technologies Inc. and Amazon have been looking for large office space at the Farley Building, say people briefed on the matter. Part of the former James A. Farley Post Office will be used as a train hall for Penn Station.

New York is emerging as an East Coast hub for technology because of the size of its labor force, its extensive transportation infrastructure and the cultural and entertainment activities that come with a big city, analysts and real-estate executives said.

“New York has lured the talent, and now the employers need to set up shop to lure that talent,” said Kevin Egan, an executive at Oxford Properties Group, which is one of Google’s Manhattan landlords. “These tenants want to be here and need to be here.”

The city’s tech frenzy comes barely four months after Amazon stunned developers and others in the business community by canceling plans for a second-headquarters project in Long Island City, Queens. Some elected officials had criticized a government incentive package of as much as $3 billion to lure the retail giant.

Amazon’s abrupt reversal sent shock waves through the New York real estate community, with some suggesting that the company’s decision to bolt could discourage other major tech companies from considering the city.
Instead, interest among social media, e-commerce and ride-hailing companies has been intensifying. Many of these companies are willing to spend big dollars renting high-end Manhattan real estate, rather than the older office stock in Queens that Amazon was prepared to lease.

“A spat between Amazon and a faction of City Council is not going to prevent the continued tech boom of New York,” said Matthew Harrigan, chief executive of Company, a venture that manages a tech-centric serviced office building in Midtown Manhattan.

Tech-sector jobs have increased at a faster clip than the city’s overall job growth. The top tech-job categories, which include software publishers, internet publishing and web search portals, averaged 9.6% growth annually between 2009 and 2018 in New York City, according to economist James Parrott at the New School. That growth was almost four times as fast as the average annual private-sector job growth.

New York’s prominence as a global financial capital and center of fashion, advertising and marketing makes it attractive for tech companies looking to poach workers from these industries, analysts said.

“Social media companies have to sell ads to have revenue streams, and New York City is the advertising capital,” Mr.  Parrott said. “If you want smart people in advertising, you have to come to New York City for that.”
Tech companies have had a presence in New York City, but now they look eager to go bigger. Since 2015, Uber has more than doubled its office space in New York City to about 160,000 square feet, while Amazon has boosted its office space almost three times to about 800,000 square feet, according to CoStar Group Inc. Facebook’s office space is now at least three times as large as it was five years ago.


“A company like Facebook and others are expanding because they are running out of talent in Silicon Valley and San Francisco,” said Paul Leonard, a managing consultant at CoStar.

Technology, ad, media and information companies leased 74% more space in the first half of 2019 than they did a year earlier, according to Cushman & Wakefield PLC. That group of companies, known as the TAMI sector, leased space at a faster clip than the financial industry, which signed deals for 70% more office space.

In 2018, Toronto-based Oxford Properties and a partner bought St. John’s Terminal on Manhattan’s west side for $700 million, with tech tenants in mind. The former freight terminal, which Google will occupy, has floor sizes of over 100,000 square feet, high ceilings and views of the Hudson River, enticing features for tech and ad tenants, Mr. Egan said.

Oxford initially planned for a $2 billion development that would add abundant outdoor terraces and decks before landing Google. It is now redeveloping the property as the centerpiece of a campus in the Hudson Square neighborhood, where Google will ultimately occupy three buildings.

—Konrad Putzier contributed to this article.
Write to Keiko Morris at Keiko.Morris@wsj.com

Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jeanette on July 11, 2019, 12:52:54 PM
Suddenly, it's the 1990s and I'm in MySpace.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: buzz on July 21, 2019, 11:05:21 AM
People forget that Bezos backed out because of his penis pics, putting his private infidelities over business, like all oligarchs.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jeanette on July 21, 2019, 11:50:36 AM


 ??? "Bezos backed out because of his penis pics" :D
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jh35 on July 26, 2019, 12:24:21 AM

From TheRealDeal.com:

Amazon considers We Company’s HQ in New York office search
The technology giant is considering multiple sites across the city


July 25, 2019 04:10PM

(https://therealdeal.com/national/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/1200-Amazon-considers-We-Company%E2%80%99s-HQ-in-New-York-office-search-651x406.jpg)

From left: WeWork CEO Adam Neumann, 424 Fifth Avenue, and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (Credit: Getty Images)

The We Company may not actually occupy its own global headquarters after all.
The co-working firm has discussed leasing the entire 11-story buildingat 424 Fifth Avenue to Amazon, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The talks were part of a wider search Amazon is conducting to find office space in New York, the Journal reported. Amazon has also considered leasing portions of the building, though the current state of talks couldn’t be determined. One person familiar with talks told the Journal that Amazon had considered paying more than $110 a square foot for the space.

After a series of delays, the We Company closed on the historic Lord & Taylor building in February for $850 million. It quickly tapped its chief architect Bjarke Ingels to preserve and renovate the roughly 600,000-square-foot landmarked building. According to the design he submitted, the lower floors were to remain retail spaces while the upper floors would be occupied by the We Company.

The Journal report comes just months after the technology giant famously abandoned a plan to spend $2.5 billion on a new headquarters in Long Island City. Amazon has said it will continue to expand in New York City, where it has 5,000 employees. In June, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos spent $80 million on three units at 212 Fifth Avenue.

In addition to the Fifth Avenue building, Amazon has reportedly considered other office sites across the city, including the Farley Post Office. [WSJ] — Sylvia Varnham O’Regan
Tags: Amazon, commercial, We Company, WeWork

Short URL
http://bit.ly/2K53wWS
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: Jhqns76 on July 27, 2019, 09:08:57 PM
How are new jobs bad for the neighborhood? I don’t get it
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 27, 2019, 09:24:21 PM
How are new jobs bad for the neighborhood? I don’t get it

what new jobs?
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: Shelby2 on July 27, 2019, 10:02:28 PM
Here's a summary of the jobs that were lost when the Amazon Queens deal fell through:

Jobs
Amazon would have reportedly generated $27.5 billion in city and state revenue over 25 years—a 9:1 ratio of revenue to subsidies. This arrangement was predicated on Amazon creating at least 25,000 jobs over the next decade—and up to 40,000—with an average salary of $150,000, the memorandum said. Another 1,300 jobs were in the pipeline for construction and some 107,000 in total direct and indirect jobs were anticipated, according to state estimates.

Amazon, the city, and state initially planned to commit $5 million each toward workforce development. The deal also planned for a local nonprofit to open a training center on the HQ2 campus to mentor and recruit Long Island City locals, according to the city. A $10 million expansion of the city’s JobsPlus program into the Queensbridge Houses—the largest public housing complex in the country—was set to take shape. Additionally, the de Blasio administration planned to launch a $3-5 million program geared toward training NYCHA residents for careers in IT, cybersecurity, and web development.

https://ny.curbed.com/2019/2/14/18225029/amazon-hq2-nyc-deal-canceled
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 27, 2019, 11:07:12 PM
I'm still getting my head around how and why sex work jobs are being validated.
And these Amazon jobs denigrated.
It's like Bizarro world in DC comics.
Or from Macbeth..."Fair is foul and foul is fair"
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jh35 on July 28, 2019, 02:37:28 AM
from techcrunch.com:

Did New York lose anything with Amazon’s rejection? It’s complicated.

Jonathan Shieber@jshieber / 5 months ago

Now that Amazon has said that it’s taking its ball and going home rather than deal with mean, pushy New Yorkers, outside observers are giving off the sense that the city (and its local politicians) are losing out for their recalcitrance.

They’re wrong.

New York City is running at about a 4.3 percent unemployment rate — higher than the national average of 3.9 percent, but a respectable number for jobs. Amazon’s promise of 25,000 jobs (high-paying jobs) may have reduced that number, but there’s no guarantee that those jobs would be filled by New Yorkers or Queens residents more specifically — and every indication that they would have gone to Amazon employees coming from somewhere else.

Remember, Amazon employees were buying real estate in Queens before the deal was even announced.

The response that New Yorkers are idiots for not giving Amazon (one of the most valuable companies in the world) billions in tax incentives to build an office tower in one of its boroughs is another sign of how the country privileges business interests above civic ones.

“new york city is such a valuable and desirable place to do business that literally no company on earth can resist coming here which is why we were forced to bribe amazon” is a curious argument for the governor to keep making

— tc (@chillmage) February 14, 2019


There are things that New York can do to boost its local economy without giving away the store to Amazon. There are incentives that could go to businesses already in New York to establish offices in Queens.

More importantly, local Queens residents had legitimate concerns about how their neighborhood would be transformed by Amazon’s entrance into the borough.

That’s not to say that local politicians may not have overplayed their hand. New York local politics is no stranger to graft, corruption, shakedowns or funny business (I wasn’t in the room for the negotiations), but it’s safe to say that “mistakes were made” on both sides.

In the long run, Amazon would have been a benefit to the New York economy — and had the company’s executives made a good-faith effort to listen to the concerns of local residents, perhaps it could have come out looking like a winner.

Because there are legitimate reasons to expect Amazon to be a benefit to the New York economy. As Noah Smith wrote in Bloomberg after the deal was announced:

Amazon will pay property tax on its new Long Island City offices. It will pay corporate tax — not just on its profits, but on its capital base. Its employees, especially highly paid ones, will pay the city’s personal income tax. Those taxes, of course, will be somewhat offset by the incentives that the city has promised the company — up to $2 billion, depending on how many people the company hires and how many facilities it builds. Those incentives were a wasteful way to attract corporate investment. But in the long run, the tax revenue New York City gets from HQ2 will probably far exceed the cost.

And that’s not even taking into account Amazon’s effect on surrounding businesses and property values. Other technology companies will want to move to Queens now that Amazon is there. Their employees will spend their money locally, buying everything from lattes to MRIs. Some estimates place HQ2’s local economic boost at $17 billion a year. Even dividing that in half, and even assuming that the estimate is optimistic by a factor of 2 or 3, it seems likely that the economic benefit Queens reaps from HQ2 will quickly exceed the upfront cost — unlike, say, Wisconsin’s ill-advised Foxconn factory.

Those benefits are true, but harder to quantify for a city like New York when taken against the impact those jobs and spending would have on the fabric of the local economy and the housing, transit and government services that new residents would demand.

The livability crisis that’s currently afflicting Seattle and San Francisco is evidence of how cities need to be careful what they wish for when it comes to the explosive growth of technology companies (and the attendant wealth that comes with it) in their metropolises.

In any event, the urban landscape of the U.S. is being radically reshaped by technology companies — creating cities that are haves and have-nots much as technology has bifurcated the national economy into digital haves and have nots.

As Mark Muro and Robert Maxim of the Brookings Institute noted in this piece for US News and World Report:

Scholars have for years suspected that tech might alter the hierarchy of cities, given its bias toward skilled workers. More than a decade ago, researchers Paul Beaudry, Mark Doms and Ethan G. Lewis showed cities that adopted personal computers earliest and fastest saw their relative wages increase the quickest. Now, there is more evidence – including in our own work – that digital technologies are contributing heavily to the divergence of metro economies and the pull away of superstar cities like Boston and San Francisco from more ordinary ones, with painful impacts.

Recently, Princeton economist Elisa Giannone demonstrated that the divergence of cities’ wages since 1980 – after decades of convergence – reflects a mix of technology’s increased rewards to highly skilled tech workers and tech-driven industry clustering. Likewise, Brookings research has shown that a short list of highly digital, often coastal tech hubs is growing even more digital and pulling farther away from the pack on measures of growth and income. What we call the “digitization of everything” is in this way exacerbating the unevenness of America’s economic landscape.



It’s far easier to make the case that Amazon’s decision to set up regional offices in Nashville will have far more positive outcomes for that city.

But making American cities compete beauty pageant-style and bend over backwards to appease a multi-billion-dollar corporation is pretty gross — and a poor read of national sentiment around the roles that technology companies play in modern American society.

As an example of how to expand in a city without invoking the wrath of the local community, observers need only look at how Google is expanding in New York. The company is planning to add 14,000 jobs in the city and has committed to $1 billion in spending to upgrade its West side campuses.

Ostensibly, Google is expanding its presence in New York to compete for the talent it sees coming from the city (or coming to the city) and because New York is strategically important. Amazon’s decision to forsake New York means that it’s losing access to that talent and creating opportunities for other tech companies to come in and take its place — or for local companies to retain their edge.

Here’s hoping that New York’s local tech community can supply Queens with those 25,000 jobs by building the next Amazon — and working with the community to do it.

These days it seems like Democracy is a religion that’s replaced God with money. The pushback against Amazon shows that New York at least is adding civic responsibility into that equation somewhere.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 28, 2019, 09:55:49 AM
I have no doubt that New York will continue to attract high paying tech jobs.  This is New York, after all.

But if I were a kid in a Queens High School, my takeaway would be...Tech jobs bad. Sex worker jobs good.

And because life can be where your dreams take you, dreams of sex work are being reinforced. While those of tech jobs dismissed.

It's a crazy world here in Queens!
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JHMNY on July 29, 2019, 01:27:29 PM
Daily News:

After Amazon left, silence: A public housing resident says politicians and others who claimed to care about jobs have done nothing since (https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-after-amazon-left-silence-20190729-msx7fbuqrfhhrfzo6er2s4vmim-story.html)

About six months ago, one of the biggest companies in the world was set to move in across the street from the public housing development where I live, bringing up to 40,000 quality jobs and billions in investment — investment in job training and workforce development, in infrastructure and in the lives of a community long overlooked by many of our elected leaders.

Then, just like that, the deal was off, as politicians railed against a supposed government “giveaway” that wasn’t. We’re still angry about it.

As president of the Queensbridge Houses Tenant Association, I represent the residents of the largest public housing complex in America. And while we heard it over and over that Amazon didn’t care about the local community, I knew otherwise.

That’s because I, along with others in the neighborhood, had a seat at the table. We had meetings. They listened. We were making progress. Under discussion: a job-training center to provide skills that last a career, a workforce development initiative with LaGuardia Community College, modern vocational after-school programs similar to the new high school at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, internships for our children — all just 10 minutes away. Not to mention thousands of union construction and building service jobs.

This was a genuine opportunity. It would have made a real difference in the lives of my neighbors. And we had a voice. Now, when we see articles claiming that New York City is doing just fine, thank you, when it comes to adding tech companies regardless of what happened at Anable Basin, we feel that same sense of neglect we’ve felt for decades.

What irks me most of all is that since Amazon pulled the plug on Valentine’s Day, we haven’t heard a word from the people who claimed to care about us. Not a word about the potential for new jobs and workforce opportunities, no sign of new parks or affordable housing along the waterfront. And if something is being planned, this time we — unlike in the Amazon discussions — are getting left out.


Full article at above link.


Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 29, 2019, 02:41:20 PM
Daily News:

After Amazon left, silence: A public housing resident says politicians and others who claimed to care about jobs have done nothing since (https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-after-amazon-left-silence-20190729-msx7fbuqrfhhrfzo6er2s4vmim-story.html)

About six months ago, one of the biggest companies in the world was set to move in across the street from the public housing development where I live, bringing up to 40,000 quality jobs and billions in investment — investment in job training and workforce development, in infrastructure and in the lives of a community long overlooked by many of our elected leaders.

Then, just like that, the deal was off, as politicians railed against a supposed government “giveaway” that wasn’t. We’re still angry about it.

As president of the Queensbridge Houses Tenant Association, I represent the residents of the largest public housing complex in America. And while we heard it over and over that Amazon didn’t care about the local community, I knew otherwise.

That’s because I, along with others in the neighborhood, had a seat at the table. We had meetings. They listened. We were making progress. Under discussion: a job-training center to provide skills that last a career, a workforce development initiative with LaGuardia Community College, modern vocational after-school programs similar to the new high school at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, internships for our children — all just 10 minutes away. Not to mention thousands of union construction and building service jobs.

This was a genuine opportunity. It would have made a real difference in the lives of my neighbors. And we had a voice. Now, when we see articles claiming that New York City is doing just fine, thank you, when it comes to adding tech companies regardless of what happened at Anable Basin, we feel that same sense of neglect we’ve felt for decades.

What irks me most of all is that since Amazon pulled the plug on Valentine’s Day, we haven’t heard a word from the people who claimed to care about us. Not a word about the potential for new jobs and workforce opportunities, no sign of new parks or affordable housing along the waterfront. And if something is being planned, this time we — unlike in the Amazon discussions — are getting left out.


Full article at above link.

Predictable. After a political "feel good" action against "the rich" Amazon...Nothing.
That's the reality of these situations.

As for what's being created @ Anable Basin where Queensboro Houses now have no say...Of course they have no say.
Because what's being built now is luxury condos. For the rich.

And, ironically, not a peep from those who peeped loudly before...

But, also, where was this person's voice when the fracas was happening? Drowned out? Silent? Silenced?




Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JH3525 on July 29, 2019, 05:12:54 PM
abcdefghijk:  JHMNY wrote this incredibly written message and how the Queensbridge Houses Tenants have lost an incredibly opportunity for its residents who would have benefited significantly from an Amazon Headquarters in Long Island City and you post this highly irresponsible message that only the rich would have benefited by purchasing luxury high rise condos.  Your message is an insult and disgrace to the President of Queensbridge Houses and its residents who looked forward to the many opportunities Amazon would have brought to the their community especially the many programs Amazon would have had for the many disadvantaged youth living in Queensbridge which are mostly Black. 
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 29, 2019, 05:18:12 PM
abcdefghijk:  JHMNY wrote this incredibly written message and how the Queensbridge Houses Tenants have lost an incredibly opportunity for its residents who would have benefited significantly from an Amazon Headquarters in Long Island City and you post this highly irresponsible message that only the rich would have benefited by purchasing luxury high rise condos.  Your message is an insult and disgrace to the President of Queensbridge Houses and its residents who looked forward to the many opportunities Amazon would have brought to the their community especially the many programs Amazon would have had for the many disadvantaged youth living in Queensbridge which are mostly Black.

Interesting. You have completely misread my message. Please reread it again...Because I agree with you.  And so reread it through that lens. But I still wonder where this voice was when the fracas was happening. The Amazon deal could have done with some positive angle from Queensboro houses!
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: jeanette on July 29, 2019, 05:23:28 PM
JHMNY wrote this incredibly written message and how the Queensbridge Houses Tenants have lost an incredibly opportunity for its residents who would have benefited significantly from an Amazon Headquarters in Long Island City....

JHMNY is April Simpson?
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JH3525 on July 29, 2019, 05:51:46 PM
abcdefghijk:  If I did misread your confusing written message then I certainly owe you an apology. 
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JHMNY on July 29, 2019, 05:58:07 PM
JHMNY wrote this incredibly written message and how the Queensbridge Houses Tenants have lost an incredibly opportunity for its residents who would have benefited significantly from an Amazon Headquarters in Long Island City....

JHMNY is April Simpson?

No... lol.  I just shared the link from the Daily News.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 29, 2019, 06:18:48 PM
abcdefghijk:  If I did misread your confusing written message then I certainly owe you an apology.

Apology accepted.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 29, 2019, 09:42:08 PM
http://labor411.org/411-blog/journalist-who-took-job-at-amazon-we-got-18-minutes-total-break-time-for-11-5-hour-shift/?fbclid=IwAR1zg8p1idyOHpvNb33dv02ReKyTm5djhY3Fb0Fe_m5kg-1iRgWkrixbXKg
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 30, 2019, 09:10:34 AM
It's useless to debate the situation. Amazon isn't coming to Queens.

We can watch and comment on what happens while Amazon goes to Manhattan/Brooklyn.

Meanwhile, here in Queens, we can observe how our own seemingly preferred industry, sex work, is faring.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 30, 2019, 09:43:49 AM
It's useless to debate the situation. Amazon isn't coming to Queens.

We can watch and comment on what happens while Amazon goes to Manhattan/Brooklyn.

Meanwhile, here in Queens, we can observe how our own seemingly preferred industry, sex work, is faring.

manhattan has the lion's share of sex work in the five boroughs.

the wealthy and powerful need to have sex workers within easy reach.

manhattan will always be the sex work capital of the state, if not the nation.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 30, 2019, 10:54:07 AM
Someone else can debate with you, DSSJH.

It ain't gonna be me.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: dssjh on July 30, 2019, 11:35:50 AM
i realize that.

you don't debate.

you make proclamations, then claim anyone disputing them is "disrespecting your boundaries."

have a great day.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: abcdefghijk on July 30, 2019, 12:26:31 PM

have a great day.

Thank you for your good wishes.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: JK resident on July 30, 2019, 09:25:40 PM
Amazon is looking to come to Queens but is looking to bring low income jobs in warehouses.

 https://patch.com/new-york/queens/amazon-eyeing-queens-new-warehouse-report
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: sl on July 31, 2019, 10:17:44 AM
Amazon is looking to come to Queens but is looking to bring low income jobs in warehouses.

 https://patch.com/new-york/queens/amazon-eyeing-queens-new-warehouse-report

I guess that’s better than nothing. I hope AOC will not try to ruin it again for people of NYC.
Title: Re: Amazon Revisited
Post by: buzz on August 01, 2019, 03:00:10 PM
Amazon is looking to come to Queens but is looking to bring low income jobs in warehouses.

 https://patch.com/new-york/queens/amazon-eyeing-queens-new-warehouse-report

I guess that’s better than nothing. I hope AOC will not try to ruin it again for people of NYC.
What are you talking about?   She didn't ruin it for anyone . Bezos pulled out once his penis pix got out as a means of distraction.  This had to do with the people of LIC and their representatives.