Jackson Heights Life

Get Connected => Neighborhood Chat => Topic started by: Shelby2 on December 27, 2016, 01:27:14 PM

Title: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on December 27, 2016, 01:27:14 PM
I noticed today there is finally some work going on in the former health food store space on 37th a few doors down from 83rd and 37th. The space has been empty for quite some time. The former Pan & Mas storefront almost across the street from this space still seems to be empty.

It looks like there will be two upcoming vacancies on the block between 84th St. and 85th St. near the current health food/organic store location. Both the florist on the corner of 85th and the small furniture store have going out of business signs on them. Not sure if anything is planned to take over yet.

Could be an exciting year for new retail, with the new Swim Two Birds, and (fingers crossed) retail coming into the Bruson building, and also the new Old Navy on 82nd St.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: jeanette on December 27, 2016, 01:56:30 PM
I asked the furniture guy why he's leaving. He said "they want the whole building" or ...the whole block," or "the whole thing." He was a bit of a distance from me and he was closing up so I couldn't hear him well.

We may lose all those small stores. Besides the furniture store and florist, what else is on that block? Kelly's (post office)?

Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: francis on December 27, 2016, 02:38:34 PM
Weren't there plans to build on the top of those stores.  I know mostly everyone was against this and people went to landmarks to oppose it.  Looks like the owner may want everyone out for construction
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: dssjh on December 27, 2016, 02:39:02 PM
is colony liquor on that block, or one block over?
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Palermo on December 27, 2016, 02:53:42 PM
Colony is a block over.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: jeanette on December 27, 2016, 03:16:26 PM
I have to sit still as I am soaking my foot, so thought I'd Google Map the block.

Aside from Downtown Market, the furniture store and the corner florist, there's Kelly's (post office) and Kelly's Cleaners, a fabric store, Josefine hair salon, and a Hispanic restaurant la Picada.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: francis on December 27, 2016, 05:07:41 PM
Are all those places under the same owner? I think there are two buildings one attached to the other.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Shelby2 on December 27, 2016, 07:17:42 PM
Both the florist on the corner of 85th and the small furniture store have going out of business signs on them. Not sure if anything is planned to take over yet.

I passed by again this evening and noticed that the "store closing" signs had been removed from the furniture store. Not sure what to make of that.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: jeanette on December 27, 2016, 08:26:31 PM
Correct, the signs are no longer there. A little history... Kelly's Cleaners also had a going out of biz sign up a few months ago, and then it was removed. I asked about it at the time and the guy there told me that he worked it out (the lease) with the building.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: mrleefromny on December 30, 2016, 06:59:53 PM
Does anyone know what is going in on 81st and Roosevelt at the former Gus (Ecuadorian food spot).
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: missmarty on January 06, 2017, 08:22:36 AM
Don't be so quick to change topic on the block of 84-85 on North side of 37th.
Also block of 83-84 on South side. That block has 7 empty storefronts. The anchor shop is Chivito D'Oro.

It appears that whomever is in possession is trying to empty the total area.
Last year, during snow events they never shoveled. We called Crowley's office and he managed to get it done.

Building owners are responsible for snow removal- that's a good time to find out who they are too.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: JackM on January 06, 2017, 04:42:44 PM
Alex, who owns Kelly's Cleaners, is retiring some time this year.  So that space will be vacant.  The landlord apparently was not letting the tenants sign leases but would go month to month.  He wants to build up on top of what is there.  The furniture store next to Kelly's every couple of months has a going out of business sign up.  I guess he then works out something with the building owner. 
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: E train on January 06, 2017, 07:06:58 PM
Two depressing additions to the list of small shops closing in JH. Ingrids Beauty Shop on 78th and 35th and the pizza store also on 35th between 77th and 78th. Both places had been there for some time -the pizza place had a changed ownership not too long ago. I suppose the worst outcome is that these two prime sites just get boarded up and left to rot like the store on 35th near 76th street which was supposed to be the site of a new restaurant but now just appears to be inactive. There seems so much potential in the neighborhood for new developments but we seem to only attract banks,drug stores or chain clothing outlets.
 
Is there any indication that the political class in JH has any interest in this ?
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 06, 2017, 07:18:23 PM
Two depressing additions to the list of small shops closing in JH. Ingrids Beauty Shop on 78th and 35th and the pizza store also on 35th between 77th and 78th. Both places had been there for some time -the pizza place had a changed ownership not too long ago. I suppose the worst outcome is that these two prime sites just get boarded up and left to rot like the store on 35th near 76th street which was supposed to be the site of a new restaurant but now just appears to be inactive. There seems so much potential in the neighborhood for new developments but we seem to only attract banks,drug stores or chain clothing outlets.
 
Is there any indication that the political class in JH has any interest in this ?

Wow.  I look at this with a completely different attitude.

I am really curious as to what does go into the vacant stores...the ex-pizza place is having work done on it...brown paper is on the windows...and who knows who'll rent out INGRID's.  There's a "for rent" sign...someone will eventually.

I'm open to what does open up. 

Besides, like I said before... a business makes it or not...depending on how folks vote with their dollars.  That's simply the rule of business. Everywhere in the entire capitalist world.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: reeta08 on April 18, 2017, 09:16:40 AM
Ingrid's moved to Northern Blvd, on the block where Denny's is.
Title: Empty store fronts
Post by: Bel84 on May 14, 2017, 08:49:41 PM
It is my understanding that the  landlords in JH would rather keep stores empty if they can't get sky high rents because they can take it as a tax loss. Is there anything that can be done about this. It really keeps entrepreneurs and mom & pop stores out of the neighborhood. We will become a nabe of chain stores and I don't think that's what our population wants or needs. Can anyone shed light on why stores (especially restaurants and bars) can pop up in neighboring communities but seem to be shut out here. Yes I know we have many long standing restaurants but new ones seem to have a very tough time of it. Can we as a community do anything about this? Any insight appreciated.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on May 14, 2017, 10:05:50 PM
I agree that this is particularly prevalent in our neighborhood.

(Commercial landlords preferring to wait for high paying tenants)

For instance, the stores in Greenpoint, Brooklyn are maybe half/two thirds the rent of those in Jackson Heights.

And this enables the mix of stores to be interesting.  From Polish to Artisan and everything in between.

The gossip I have heard is that the families who own the commercial property don't live in the neighborhood and so are not particularly interested in how the neighborhood fares.  It's simply a cash cow managed by agents.

What can be done?... that is a good question.

Maybe the city can be picketed to impose a tax on empty storefronts?

With the tax increasing the longer the store-front is empty.

...But in truth, that sort of a law sounds like it might be tough to pass.









 






Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Stew on May 14, 2017, 10:18:31 PM
I've said this before and I'll say it again.

It is very hard to explain the range of rent demands on 37th Avenue, some of which are self-evidently reasonable for the area and some of which rival the most expensive rents in Manhattan per square foot, as just the market at work.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JHMNY on May 15, 2017, 12:01:57 PM
Empty storefronts have been a problem in the neighborhood, but the specific row of long-standing empty storefronts at the Bruson Building drives me nuts each time I pass by.  I've always thought that if the community requested an update from the Bruson family, perhaps they'd be willing to oblige.  I know representatives of the family made an appearance at a town hall a while back, but it's due time for a status update. 


Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: newjhuser on May 16, 2017, 11:55:27 AM
Bruunson building received the coa
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: cultartist on May 16, 2017, 12:04:08 PM
Here's a question--can some of these rules be changed by our own city council?  Can they be changed locally?  Can there be some kind of incentive program for new businesses and locally run companies and/or penalties and taxes for keeping storefronts vacant?  Is this something that can come from and be initiated by Danny Dromm and Jose Peralta?  It's hard to believe that vacant buildings and anonymous chains have to be such a big part of our very awesome neighborhood.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on May 16, 2017, 12:23:10 PM
Empty storefronts have been a problem in the neighborhood, but the specific row of long-standing empty storefronts at the Bruson Building drives me nuts each time I pass by.  I've always thought that if the community requested an update from the Bruson family, perhaps they'd be willing to oblige.  I know representatives of the family made an appearance at a town hall a while back, but it's due time for a status update.

There was a bit of news about this just after you posted.  https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170515/jackson-heights/bruson-building-reopening-jackson-heights-fire-37th-avenue

excerpt:
"With all of the paperwork out of the way, Bruno said they hope to begin signing leases with new tenants this summer. So far, the only confirmed tenant is Habib Bank, who opened their first Jackson Heights branch in the building in 1988. The owners said they're "accepting anyone who wants to look at the building" as prospective tenants, Bruno said."
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on May 16, 2017, 07:36:07 PM
as a lifelong leftist/commie/agitator, i fall squarely into the camp of forcing evil landlords to do the bidding of the great unwashed like us. but can that really be put into action in an america on the current path?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JHMNY on May 17, 2017, 11:39:32 AM
There was a bit of news about this just after you posted.  https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170515/jackson-heights/bruson-building-reopening-jackson-heights-fire-37th-avenue

excerpt:
"With all of the paperwork out of the way, Bruno said they hope to begin signing leases with new tenants this summer. So far, the only confirmed tenant is Habib Bank, who opened their first Jackson Heights branch in the building in 1988. The owners said they're "accepting anyone who wants to look at the building" as prospective tenants, Bruno said."

Thanks for the update, Shelby.  So, it appears that the delay was in obtaining a certificate of occupancy.  Keeping my fingers crossed that we'll get some interesting businesses setting up shop at the Bruson.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: queenskid2 on May 23, 2017, 03:44:22 PM
The last part of this story outlines some possible solutions to empty storefronts.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/manhattan/vacant-stores-shuttered-venues-plague-once-vibrant-bleecker-st-article-1.3189582
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: M7X7 on May 24, 2017, 08:24:25 AM
Quote
The report also includes a number of legislative solutions to address the problem. Among them would be the creation of a New York City Legacy Business Registry, implementation of retail zoning restrictions for chain stores, and phasing out of tax deductions for landlords with persistent vacancies.

Seems like the bolded would solve the problem on its own. The tax code making it more advantageous to keep an empty store than lower rents to attract tenants is what economists call a "perverse incentive." Reform that, and the market will naturally adapt prices to what people can actually pay.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on May 24, 2017, 10:55:08 AM
Quote
The report also includes a number of legislative solutions to address the problem. Among them would be the creation of a New York City Legacy Business Registry, implementation of retail zoning restrictions for chain stores, and phasing out of tax deductions for landlords with persistent vacancies.

Seems like the bolded would solve the problem on its own. The tax code making it more advantageous to keep an empty store than lower rents to attract tenants is what economists call a "perverse incentive." Reform that, and the market will naturally adapt prices to what people can actually pay.

Agreed.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Ed on June 23, 2017, 05:41:17 PM
This is pretty interesting... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7zXmGZa6IU)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on June 23, 2017, 05:44:42 PM
This is pretty interesting... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7zXmGZa6IU)

That is interesting. I always thought there was some sort of money making scam going on with the empty storefronts, but I thought it was limited to tax write-offs.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: M7X7 on June 24, 2017, 10:30:00 AM
This is pretty interesting... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7zXmGZa6IU)

For those who don't want to watch a video:

Landlord raises rent a lot, regardless of whether anyone is willing to pay (i.e. above true market value).
High rent is used to claim a (fake) high value for the building, despite it sitting empty.
High value for the building is used as collatoral for a bank loan.
Bank loan is used to make other investments.
Other investments apparently make enough profit to compensate for loan interest AND lost rental income, because the latter is a tax write off.

Result: landlord and bank win, community and taxpayer lose. And if the economy as a whole falters, the whole thing collapses.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on June 24, 2017, 11:32:00 PM
Finally a logical explanation for what certainly always looked like some mysterious scam.

THANK YOU

And so the bank sells off the loans as AAA just like they sold the sub prime mortgage loans as AAA. When they aren't .

And commercial rents in our neighborhood are definitely not worth what is being asked.

Reality is that the properties are being overvalued to rort the system.

This is just like the sub prime fiasco 10 years ago. Only this time with commercial landlords.

This explains why some store owners pay far less rent.

My guess is the landlord pretends they pay more. In order to create the illusion the property is worth far more than it is worth.

Very imaginative scam. That will eventually come crashing down. As all scams do.
Because the valuations are false.

As for the neighborhood...it is left behind completely in this scam.


Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on June 24, 2017, 11:49:02 PM
Unfortunately my guess is that even an investigation/audit won't stop this scam.

After all Madoff was investigated many times and never caught.

It only came crashing down when the economy tanked.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: fish2001 on June 25, 2017, 01:05:48 AM
Can we put an end to this practice and keep retail spaces occupied by changing the law to require landlords prove the space is actually rented at the new rate before there's any reassessment?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on June 25, 2017, 09:33:39 AM
Can we put an end to this practice and keep retail spaces occupied by changing the law to require landlords prove the space is actually rented at the new rate before there's any reassessment?

can we donate as much to politicians as landlords do, in order to get an equal voice?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on June 25, 2017, 10:50:24 AM
The only possible way I can see the lid being blown off this racket... is some serious investigative journalism by the New York Times or Village Voice. My guess is the headline EMPTY SHOP SYNDROME would interest all New Yorkers.

Perhaps the reporters might be curious to read these particular blog topic posts...?

Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Ed on June 25, 2017, 12:22:14 PM
You like that, you should check out LTV or "loan to value" financing in the real estate/development world.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on June 25, 2017, 02:20:33 PM
this exact thing happened when i lived on the lower east side in the early '80s.

people were SHOCKED and APPALLED and dozens of stories were written in efforts to keep the mom and pop ethnic businesses safe from harm amid 700-1000 percent rent hikes. i wrote my journalism school thesis on the topic. my focus was a lovely 40 year old coffee shop called the orchidia - packed from breakfast through dinner - that had a landlord who asked $5000 per month, versus the $500 they were paying. they couldn't pay, and were replaced by the then-hip Steve's Ice Cream chain, which lasted five months.

nothing happened.

nothing happened in carroll gardens. nothing happened in the west village. nothing happened in the meatpacking district.

 just a few weeks ago, you posted an ode to how the city is always changing, and noting how foolish it is to try to stand in the way of "progress" -- the phony "progress" that is the goal here.

The only possible way I can see the lid being blown off this racket... is some serious investigative journalism by the New York Times or Village Voice. My guess is the headline EMPTY SHOP SYNDROME would interest all New Yorkers.

Perhaps the reporters might be curious to read these particular blog topic posts...?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on June 25, 2017, 08:22:58 PM
DSSJH...

As I have mentioned and explained often, I refuse to take the bait.

Good luck baiting others.









Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on June 25, 2017, 09:54:30 PM
as i've mentioned before, those who cannot defend their positions do not have defensible positions.

good day, sir or madam.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Ed on June 25, 2017, 11:28:35 PM
https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/san-francisco-gentrification-longtime-businesses

https://www.sfheritage.org/legacy/legacy-business-registry-preservation-fund/

https://sfbay.ca/2017/03/15/24th-street-small-businesses-gain-city-protection/

http://voterguide.sfelections.org/en/preserving-space-neighborhood-arts-small-businesses-and-community-services-certain-neighborhoods
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on June 26, 2017, 09:26:15 AM
i'd happily let the folks who run San Francisco take the reins in NYC - even from 3000 miles away. they do a wonderful job -- although their residential rent problem is even worse than ours.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Beherenow on June 26, 2017, 05:38:24 PM
The solution at the end of the Daily News article seems like a no-brainer:  "phasing out of tax deductions for landlords with persistent vacancies."  Does anyone know if this simple idea has ever been seriously considered and/or proposed in the City Council or the state legislature? It makes sense not only for neighborhoods like ours, but because the public sector needs tax revenues. I couldn't find any reference to it on Google (admittedly didn't look too hard).
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on June 26, 2017, 05:52:55 PM
From what I figure it's not only tax deductions...the  landlords are after...

It's the inflated (false) values of the buildings to use as collateral in order to get loans to invest in high yield ventures.

Thinking about it...I suppose that this practice might stop naturally as soon as interest rates go up...

Interest rates for loans are historically low...and I imagine that can't last forever...

The scam is really a function of low interest loans that are readily available these days (and have been since the Recession)

So there might be some cessation of the racket in the future...when interest rates go back up...
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on July 08, 2017, 01:25:59 PM
i made my monthly (ish) trek to Sorisso this morning, and decided, on a whim, to walk down Steinway instead of getting off at 46th as i usually do.

i lived in Astoria from the very end of 1989 until the very end of 1996, and i've never seen it look as much like a ghost town as it does. since i saw two back to back vacant storefronts as soon as i turned from Broadway - the former Claire's and a leather store - i decided to count.

Steinway between B'way and 31st avenue: 8 vacant storefronts, mostly large ones.
Steinway between 31st and 30th avenue: 18 vacant storefronts. Eighteen.

what's left is mostly national chains, big name fast food and banks. the locally owned stuff is almost all gone. this could be our future if things keep going the way they are.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: jeanette on July 08, 2017, 03:04:47 PM
I was on Madison and 38th yesterday. My fave old restaurant Chez Laurence is still shuddered for its 15th year in a row.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: hagsrus on July 08, 2017, 05:56:41 PM
I used to live in Astoria early 80s and remember Steinway always seemed plagued by empty storefronts (though I never counted them). I do recall once seeing a fairly small storefront advertising "going out of business sale" in one window and "grand opening sale" in the other!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on July 08, 2017, 07:39:30 PM
well, i turned the corner onto 30th and there were six more between steinway and Sorriso (at 44th). that's 32 vacant storefronts in roughly the distance between 74th and 86th, 37th and roosevelt. i don't think we're quite that dire.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on August 23, 2017, 07:10:45 PM
Article about empty storefronts in Soho

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/23/nyregion/soho-empty-storefronts.html
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JH.77 on September 25, 2017, 11:08:12 PM
My evening walk got me wondering...
While 82nd Street has turned into a mall (Gap, Old Navy, Banana Republic, Sketchers, Foot Locker, GNC, Children's Place plus national chain fast food, banks and cell phone stores... even Target soon) it's sad to see some prime spots on 37th Avenue remain empty for months.  No, make that YEARS.   Ingrid's old hair salon at 79th Street.  The Gothic furniture shop at 83rd Street both spring to mind.   

Maybe the new strategy should be to start calling out commercial landlords for allowing their property to linger in a semi-abandoned state.

So who owns that Ingrid's space you ask? The NYC website points to a company called CAIMAN REALTY LLC  ( see how much they pay in taxes HERE: http://webapps.nyc.gov:8084/CICS/f704/f403001I?BBL=4-01278-0038- )
While real estate filings are pretty complicated with various holding companies, it looks like it's the same company that is also the owner of what also seems to be a pretty vacant building on 75th Street.  ( http://tinyurl.com/y865yrt3 ) as well as some other properties in JH.  No surprise here.. but it also looks like the person at the head of the company lives on Long Island, not JH.

It's a well kept commercial building, to give credit where it's due. And I get that landlords are taking write-offs to pad their tax losses... but for the neighborhood's sake they should do something with them in the meantime.  Imagine if Ingrid's were gallery of JH artists until a new store rented it.  Heck, you could even hang art in the window and keep the doors locked and it would be less of a blight.  There are probably lots of other ideas such as renting as a "pop up" store for the holiday season coming up.   It may even raise the value of the property and others you may own in the neighborhood!

Landlords aren't the enemy.  If you think about it, they're for better or worse part of what makes any neighborhood what it is.  So come on landlords, think of the community.  Better yet, lower your rent and allow someone to actually rent the property.  That Ingrids building goes for $52/sq ft and the last store rented for $14K/month per Street Easy ( that info is at http://streeteasy.com/building/78_19-37-avenue-queens#tab_building_detail=3 ) 

One other fun find..
So what's that building worth you ask?
Current year's total market value of the land: $1,100,000
Current year's total market value of improvements: $3,082,000 (it was $2,003,000 in 2012)
Current year's total market value: $4,182,000 (it was $3,103,000 in 2012)
Read more: http://www.city-data.com/ny-properties/assessments/Queens/3/37th-Avenue-22.html#ixzz4tkV2xb2d


Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: wlirfan on September 26, 2017, 08:22:38 AM
During the recession, when Manhattan properties went vacant, and even newly built, luxury homes with stores under them could not be filled, many landlords used their spaces as exhibition spaces for artists, all at no to low cost (a share of any sales that take place).  The places looked more attractive with something going on inside them, and eventually, the stores rented and the pop-ups went away.  But there were many memorable exhibits, and there's no reason that can't happen here either.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on September 26, 2017, 09:57:26 AM
I did notice that the FOR LEASE sign is no longer there @ the ex-Ingrid's store.

Not sure if that means it's been rented.

Or the sign simply fell down...after such a long time...

Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: ClydeM on September 28, 2017, 01:42:37 PM
I have inquired about using a few of these empty spaces as pop galleries. Either my calls were not returned or they were not at all interested. It's a shame because some of these would make excellent exhibition or even concert spaces.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Shelby2 on January 21, 2018, 10:22:17 PM
A few updates here:

The entire half block on 84th/85th north side is now empty. I assume this is because construction is due to start.

Another thing I noticed today was the Vitamin Shoppe in the 82nd St./37th Ave corner location across from the Rite Aid now appears to be completely gone. All products and store furnishings had been removed as of today.

Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: the80s on January 22, 2018, 09:17:21 AM
Another thing I noticed today was the Vitamin Shoppe in the 82nd St./37th Ave corner location across from the Rite Aid now appears to be completely gone. All products and store furnishings had been removed as of today.

That's interesting because a week or two ago, I noticed a few emergency vehicles outside the Vitamin Shoppe—it seemed, from a distance, like the sprinklers had been activated, perhaps in error (I didn't see any smoke), and had been running for quite some time. (The sidewalk was flooded and blocked off.) I wonder if this caused significant damage and they decided to cut their losses, or if this was totally unrelated.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: dssjh on January 22, 2018, 09:30:35 AM
that may be the case....last sunday (or perhaps the sunday before), i walked past and the gate was down, with a sign saying they'd be closed for one day, reopening on monday, and directing customers to the other queens stores.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Shelby2 on January 22, 2018, 10:00:46 AM
Another thing I noticed today was the Vitamin Shoppe in the 82nd St./37th Ave corner location across from the Rite Aid now appears to be completely gone. All products and store furnishings had been removed as of today.

That's interesting because a week or two ago, I noticed a few emergency vehicles outside the Vitamin Shoppe—it seemed, from a distance, like the sprinklers had been activated, perhaps in error (I didn't see any smoke), and had been running for quite some time. (The sidewalk was flooded and blocked off.) I wonder if this caused significant damage and they decided to cut their losses, or if this was totally unrelated.

Maybe what I observed was just cleanup from some sort of flood or mishap, and perhaps they will be reopening after cleanup. But it did appear most things were torn out/down.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Minimal4me on January 26, 2018, 01:49:45 PM
A few updates here:

The entire half block on 84th/85th north side is now empty. I assume this is because construction is due to start.

There was a thread about the development on this block, but I can't find it. Here's what's going up there:

(https://imgur.com/a/IMZny)

https://newyorkyimby.com/2016/08/residential-expansion-of-35-64-85th-street-jackson-heights-still-not-a-winner-at-landmarks.html
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: jeanette on January 26, 2018, 06:48:09 PM
There was a thread about the development on this block, but I can't find it. Here's what's going up there:
(https://imgur.com/a/IMZny)
https://newyorkyimby.com/2016/08/residential-expansion-of-35-64-85th-street-jackson-heights-still-not-a-winner-at-landmarks.html

https://jacksonheightspost.com/stores-now-closed-developer-closer-moving-ahead-four-story-addition

I posted this update a week ago on the r/e thread started by agentarmen.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: earbears on January 27, 2018, 02:15:23 PM
I have not seen any application for a building permit nor have the Patel's submitted the required changes that the Landmarks Commission requested.

As of now, there seems to be nothing new except empty stores
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: petster on January 27, 2018, 06:57:13 PM
I had heard awhile ago hat Ingrids was to be one of those medical emergency care places for when you need to see a doctor.  I believe there is also another one NORTHERN
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: ljr on January 27, 2018, 08:03:25 PM
There is an urgent care near the 74th and Roosevelt subway station. And one on Northern--can we really use three, I wonder?
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: dssjh on January 28, 2018, 02:06:44 PM
and the Vitamin Shoppe is back in business in the front part of the space -- with a sign promising a full reopening soon.
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Shelby2 on January 28, 2018, 04:33:03 PM
and the Vitamin Shoppe is back in business in the front part of the space -- with a sign promising a full reopening soon.

Great!
Title: Re: Storefronts in transition
Post by: Shelby2 on January 28, 2018, 04:37:59 PM
There is an urgent care near the 74th and Roosevelt subway station. And one on Northern--can we really use three, I wonder?

I'm not sure, but urgent care facilities have been popping up everywhere in NYC at a great pace in the past few years.

There's a small 4-block area of Astoria that has three of them -- Northwell Gohealth, Astoria Urgent Care, and CityMD. There are others in the rest of Astoria as well.
Title: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: the80s on April 03, 2018, 12:04:40 PM
Landlords leaving storefronts vacant in the hopes of getting top-dollar rent is a frequent topic of discussion here and seemingly a big problem in JH, so I thought this story would be of interest.

Some excerpts below; full story (worth reading) here:
https://ny.curbed.com/2018/4/2/17188918/de-blasio-retail-blight-new-york-vacancy-fee

Quote
De Blasio hints at ‘vacancy fee’ for landlords of empty storefronts

Some storefronts remain empty for months or years as landlords wait to sink high-paying tenants

 “I am very interested in fighting for a vacancy fee or a vacancy tax that would penalize landlords who leave their storefronts vacant for long periods of time in neighborhoods because they are looking for some top-dollar rent but they blight neighborhoods by doing it,” he said. “That is something we could get done through Albany.”

The mayor’s office said the initiative is in the planning phase.
...

A report released by State Senator Brad Hoylman in 2017 called “Bleaker on Bleecker” illustrates why small businesses are faltering: “Instead of renting to another independent business for a similar rent as the previous tenant, landlords will hold out for a tenant—often a large corporate chain—that is able to pay exponentially more than the previous tenant.”
...

The city doesn’t currently keep track of retail vacancies, but the City Council is considering requiring property owners with vacant commercial space to register it in an official database.

Maybe this is the kind of thing we can start getting our local representatives, both state and city, to speak up about.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Alfster on April 03, 2018, 02:52:51 PM
Landlords leaving storefronts vacant in the hopes of getting top-dollar rent is a frequent topic of discussion here and seemingly a big problem in JH, so I thought this story would be of interest.

Some excerpts below; full story (worth reading) here:
https://ny.curbed.com/2018/4/2/17188918/de-blasio-retail-blight-new-york-vacancy-fee

Quote
De Blasio hints at ‘vacancy fee’ for landlords of empty storefronts

Some storefronts remain empty for months or years as landlords wait to sink high-paying tenants

 “I am very interested in fighting for a vacancy fee or a vacancy tax that would penalize landlords who leave their storefronts vacant for long periods of time in neighborhoods because they are looking for some top-dollar rent but they blight neighborhoods by doing it,” he said. “That is something we could get done through Albany.”

The mayor’s office said the initiative is in the planning phase.
...

A report released by State Senator Brad Hoylman in 2017 called “Bleaker on Bleecker” illustrates why small businesses are faltering: “Instead of renting to another independent business for a similar rent as the previous tenant, landlords will hold out for a tenant—often a large corporate chain—that is able to pay exponentially more than the previous tenant.”
...

The city doesn’t currently keep track of retail vacancies, but the City Council is considering requiring property owners with vacant commercial space to register it in an official database.

Maybe this is the kind of thing we can start getting our local representatives, both state and city, to speak up about.

While it is disconcerting to see empty storefronts, to put in place a vacancy fee is a bad idea.  A landlord who is current on his taxes and properly maintains the property should not be subjected to additional punitive taxes by the city. 
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: queenskid2 on April 03, 2018, 05:08:49 PM
I took a walk down Steinway Street in Astoria the other day.  From around Broadway to 28th Avenue I counted 29 empty storefronts.  While the landlords may be paying their taxes, there comes a point when those empty stores start to drag down other businesses.  Maybe the answer is not the proposal mentioned above, but if landlords aren't realistic with their rent demands, and a once vibrant shopping strip starts to look like a ghost town, does the city have any obligation to act?
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: JK resident on April 03, 2018, 05:34:18 PM
The landlords are trying to adjust to the realities of the new economy. Amazon, Warby Parker etc. Many stores at malls are closing. Everyone goes to a regular store then checks the prices on their phone. Food, restaurants and banks seem to be the only things people need. ,
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: petster on April 03, 2018, 05:38:33 PM
........and pharmacies. Lots and lots of pharmacies :-)
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on April 03, 2018, 06:09:33 PM
The landlords are trying to adjust to the realities of the new economy. Amazon, Warby Parker etc. Many stores at malls are closing. Everyone goes to a regular store then checks the prices on their phone. Food, restaurants and banks seem to be the only things people need. ,

Hey, I agree with this observation.

Eventually (in say 5 years) commercial shop fronts will be worth less. (Not worthless but worth less!) It'll simply take landlords a while to adjust to that reality.

They may eventually convert shopfronts into living quarters.  Vacant apartments certainly remain in demand.

I believe this happened when NYC was losing population in the old era of the 1970's/1980's. 

Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Shelby2 on April 03, 2018, 06:32:42 PM
The landlords are trying to adjust to the realities of the new economy. Amazon, Warby Parker etc. Many stores at malls are closing. Everyone goes to a regular store then checks the prices on their phone. Food, restaurants and banks seem to be the only things people need. ,

Hey, I agree with this observation.

Eventually (in say 5 years) commercial shop fronts will be worth less. (Not worthless but worth less!) It'll simply take landlords a while to adjust to that reality.

They may eventually convert shopfronts into living quarters.  Vacant apartments certainly remain in demand.

I believe this happened when NYC was losing population in the old era of the 1970's/1980's.

The spaces are probably worth too much per square foot to be turned into artists' spaces, but it's also a thought. Many other areas of the US have been dealing with empty storefronts and ghost town downtowns for years. In Pittsfield, MA back in 2001, a storefront artists project was started and was very successful, however, it was a very different situation in Pittsfield vs. NYC, as landlords actually agreed to offer the spaces for free. I can't see that ever happening here.

Here's an article about the Pittsfield project, which closed in 2011 because it was so successful (downtown was revitalized and therefore landlords could start charging for the storefronts again). https://www.mma.org/successful-artist-run-project-pittsfield-comes-end
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: hum@njukebox1 on April 03, 2018, 07:37:07 PM
I was trying to think of a solution to the problem of empty storefronts.  What if.........landlords charged less for rent, but then took a cut of the profits if the business was successful?  Problematic for certain, but perhaps worth a try.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: dssjh on April 03, 2018, 11:01:53 PM
what if they simply didn't try to triple, quadruple or quintuple the rents every time a lease is up? residential landlords who  *could* quadruple the rent of a one bedroom rarely do that.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: JK resident on April 04, 2018, 08:40:48 AM
There has been a push from our local politicians that commercial rents should be regulated. An expiring l saw could only be increased a small amount. I don’t think the government should be into setting price controls although I know I am in the minority with this position. Of course the negative side is that we have a few landlords that own entire blocks of commercial stores and have a near monopoly on locations such as Midwood Management owns most of 74th Street. Maybe the real problem is the lack of competition from these retail monopolies.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Paul11372 on April 04, 2018, 09:07:50 AM
I was trying to think of a solution to the problem of empty storefronts.  What if.........landlords charged less for rent, but then took a cut of the profits if the business was successful?  Problematic for certain, but perhaps worth a try.


That's called a Private Equity investment and unless Tony James is hosting an Obama fundraiser, I'm pretty sure the red shirts on here would loath the idea of having PE money in the neighborhood.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Paul11372 on April 04, 2018, 09:40:05 AM
what if they simply didn't try to triple, quadruple or quintuple the rents every time a lease is up? residential landlords who  *could* quadruple the rent of a one bedroom rarely do that.


Is that a known fact? Perhaps I had not been as informed as i should be. Can you provide me some data behind that? or are you back to assuming your opinion is a fact in every and any instance?


Sometimes I think I we made you the overlord the world issues would cease
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: wlirfan on April 04, 2018, 04:22:58 PM
Taxing someone just because their property is vacant is a horrible idea.  I agree that empty stores are an eyesore, especially if the owner is absent and doesn't take care of the property at all (like the Gothic property - the owner never shoveled and the place was an ice patch), but there are solutions to assure - or to punish - an owner to keep the place clean. 

I'm a firm believer in the market.  You may be able to keep your store vacant for a year, maybe two, but eventually, you will need income and, with that, you will have to accept a lower rent.  I agree that we're in a transition period for businesses, so maybe landlords know this too and are waiting it out.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: ljr on April 04, 2018, 04:37:46 PM
Waiting it out for what? Online shopping is taking over. They are waiting it out until they can magically get higher rent--or simply till they can attract a bank or a chain pharmacy? Soon we will literally have banks and pharmacies all in a row, both sides of the street, and nothing else.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: the80s on April 04, 2018, 04:54:42 PM
You may be able to keep your store vacant for a year, maybe two, but eventually, you will need income and, with that, you will have to accept a lower rent.

I don't know if this is true—and while I hesitate to spread rumors, this seems possible—but one of the comments on the Curbed story was saying that this is actually a misconception, that except for very "small time" landlords, most (at least many?) people who own commercial real estate are real estate investors. This means they don't care at all if the storefront is empty, since rental income is small potatoes compared to the possibility that the value of the property may double in value in x many years.

One thing that raises the value of a property is a having a national retailer, like a Duane Reade or a Starbucks or a Chase, as a tenant. So that's (perhaps/supposedly/apparently) one thing that might explain why properties can actually stay vacant indefinitely, with seeming no motivation to find a renter: landlords are playing a long game, not looking for a monthly check.

There's one theory for you... though in reality it's almost certainly a variety of factors combining for this perfect storm of commercial vacancies.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: dssjh on April 05, 2018, 08:38:15 AM
there are no controls/laws regulating commercial rents.

that is a fact. it's been discussed here dozens of times.

there are laws regulating residential rent. that is a fact.

would you like chapter and verse about every huge commercial rent hike in new york city? like Pearl River Mart being forced to close after 40 plus years due to a tripling of rent to $1 million per year? or the dry cleaner that occupied the space now occupied by Al-Araf having their more than doubled?

how many examples would you like, my pedantic pal?
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Paul11372 on April 05, 2018, 09:21:15 AM
there are no controls/laws regulating commercial rents.

that is a fact. it's been discussed here dozens of times.

there are laws regulating residential rent. that is a fact.

would you like chapter and verse about every huge commercial rent hike in new york city? like Pearl River Mart being forced to close after 40 plus years due to a tripling of rent to $1 million per year? or the dry cleaner that occupied the space now occupied by Al-Araf having their more than doubled?

how many examples would you like, my pedantic pal?


what if they simply didn't try to triple, quadruple or quintuple the rents every time a lease is up? residential landlords who  *could* quadruple the rent of a one bedroom rarely do that.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: wlirfan on April 05, 2018, 12:25:56 PM
<One thing that raises the value of a property is a having a national retailer, like a Duane Reade or a Starbucks or a Chase, as a tenant. So that's (perhaps/supposedly/apparently) one thing that might explain why properties can actually stay vacant indefinitely, with seeming no motivation to find a renter: landlords are playing a long game, not looking for a monthly check.>

Most of the spaces in our neighborhood just aren't big enough for those type of tenants.  I understand that, as a landlord, that's is your goal, but when you have a small storefront, you have to face reality.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Lilybell on April 05, 2018, 12:52:36 PM
Quote
While it is disconcerting to see empty storefronts, to put in place a vacancy fee is a bad idea.  A landlord who is current on his taxes and properly maintains the property should not be subjected to additional punitive taxes by the city.

The issue is the ability to leave it vacant and get a tax write-off. Being punitive is not the answer, but what's going on is obviously not working.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Alfster on April 05, 2018, 05:24:39 PM
There has been a push from our local politicians that commercial rents should be regulated. An expiring l saw could only be increased a small amount. I don’t think the government should be into setting price controls although I know I am in the minority with this position. Of course the negative side is that we have a few landlords that own entire blocks of commercial stores and have a near monopoly on locations such as Midwood Management owns most of 74th Street. Maybe the real problem is the lack of competition from these retail monopolies.

I hope that you are not advocating a "Mao-style" redistribution of private property.   >:(
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on April 06, 2018, 11:00:52 AM
I believe that if the proposed trade tariffs with China go ahead, it'll drive even more shopping online.

Because what I can glean the tariffs only apply to commercial quantities imported.

And personal shopping direct from China would remain tariff free.

So folks will be able to buy direct from China cheaply online. While goods in stores would be at least 25% more (the tariff).

I am guessing there'll be even more empty storefronts. 

Even dollar stores could become less competitive compared with online shopping. And only people without online access or bank accounts...or those needing items immediately... will be forced to patronize them.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: dssjh on April 06, 2018, 12:25:13 PM
There has been a push from our local politicians that commercial rents should be regulated. An expiring l saw could only be increased a small amount. I don’t think the government should be into setting price controls although I know I am in the minority with this position. Of course the negative side is that we have a few landlords that own entire blocks of commercial stores and have a near monopoly on locations such as Midwood Management owns most of 74th Street. Maybe the real problem is the lack of competition from these retail monopolies.

I hope that you are not advocating a "Mao-style" redistribution of private property.   >:(

perhaps a conservative Republican style declaration of eminent domain.  8)
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Paul11372 on April 06, 2018, 12:45:57 PM
There has been a push from our local politicians that commercial rents should be regulated. An expiring l saw could only be increased a small amount. I don’t think the government should be into setting price controls although I know I am in the minority with this position. Of course the negative side is that we have a few landlords that own entire blocks of commercial stores and have a near monopoly on locations such as Midwood Management owns most of 74th Street. Maybe the real problem is the lack of competition from these retail monopolies.

I hope that you are not advocating a "Mao-style" redistribution of private property.   >:(

perhaps a conservative Republican style declaration of eminent domain.  8)



Copeland is with the GOP?
https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170425/corona/willets-west-willets-point-queens-development-group-lawsuit
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: jeanette on April 06, 2018, 01:15:57 PM
Eventually (in say 5 years) commercial shop fronts will be worth less. (Not worthless but worth less!) It'll simply take landlords a while to adjust to that reality.
They may eventually convert shopfronts into living quarters.  Vacant apartments certainly remain in demand.

...as if the landlords would rent the converted shopfronts at anything near affordable.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Paul11372 on April 06, 2018, 01:23:53 PM
Eventually (in say 5 years) commercial shop fronts will be worth less. (Not worthless but worth less!) It'll simply take landlords a while to adjust to that reality.
They may eventually convert shopfronts into living quarters.  Vacant apartments certainly remain in demand.

...as if the landlords would rent the converted shopfronts at anything near affordable.

Agreed, their greed should be called out each and every time:

https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2017/04/de-blasio-increased-his-own-rents-while-calling-for-others-to-freeze-theirs-new-figures-show-111272
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: jeanette on April 06, 2018, 01:26:39 PM
I believe that if the proposed trade tariffs with China go ahead, it'll drive even more shopping online.
Because what I can glean the tariffs only apply to commercial quantities imported.
And personal shopping direct from China would remain tariff free.
So folks will be able to buy direct from China cheaply online. While goods in stores would be at least 25% more (the tariff).
I am guessing there'll be even more empty storefronts. 
Even dollar stores could become less competitive compared with online shopping. And only people without online access or bank accounts...or those needing items immediately... will be forced to patronize them.

I would hope that we could manufacture some of that stuff ourselves. Higher prices probably, but better quality, maybe.

and perhaps we don't need a lot of that stuff. Americans need to relearn the art of repair, and of course reuse and re-purpose.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: dssjh on April 06, 2018, 03:36:04 PM
a lengthy reprise of the Great Depression will instill those values, right?
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: jeanette on April 06, 2018, 03:53:35 PM
a lengthy reprise of the Great Depression will instill those values, right?

Well, I don't believe we have to go that far, but I will agree that unilateral changes to the global economy will have its deleterious effects, some extreme. Americans are hurting, and it is showing an ugliness in our culture that I don't think can continue for much longer. I take many of our cultural ills as testament to something going very very wrong, and I am more than open to new ideas and exploring all options. Hate can't be the only reason for everything.

The status quo is unsustainable as I see it, and there are no new ideas emerging in the upcoming elections. Very worrisome. I certainly don't claim to have the answers.
Title: Re: About all those empty storefronts
Post by: Alfster on April 06, 2018, 10:18:14 PM
<One thing that raises the value of a property is a having a national retailer, like a Duane Reade or a Starbucks or a Chase, as a tenant. So that's (perhaps/supposedly/apparently) one thing that might explain why properties can actually stay vacant indefinitely, with seeming no motivation to find a renter: landlords are playing a long game, not looking for a monthly check.>

Most of the spaces in our neighborhood just aren't big enough for those type of tenants.  I understand that, as a landlord, that's is your goal, but when you have a small storefront, you have to face reality.

True.  CVS isn't moving into a 1500 sqft retail location.  Perhaps only a national cell phone retailer could use such a tiny space.
Title: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: JDinJH on September 28, 2018, 09:57:30 PM
How is it that 4 out of 12 storefronts are closed in this high traffic corridor??? 
Title: Re: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: dssjh on September 28, 2018, 10:59:28 PM
free market capitalism?
Title: Re: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: Simka on September 29, 2018, 09:31:12 PM
Are they all the same landlord?
Title: Re: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: JDinJH on October 01, 2018, 09:28:15 PM
I think if it were just plain capitalism, the storefronts would be rented.  Capitalism doesn't really exist in NYC to the extent that the state and local government regulate rent, transportation costs (e.g. train fare, bridge tolls, gas taxes, etc.), terms of employment, liquor licenses, price labels (see: https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dca/downloads/pdf/about/PricingLaws.pdf), etc. 

My guess is that it is probably a confluence of factors, including unrealistic rental goals and government interference.  Unfortunately, we lost two wonderful stores that served the needs of the community.  Hopefully, capitalism will kick in at some point in the near future and maybe the neighborhood get vendors that will serve the community's needs.   
Title: Re: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: lalochezia on October 01, 2018, 09:46:33 PM
Always an axe to grind about gubmint'.

You guessed wrong. BTW There is no commercial rent regulation, and if you think LABEL REGULATION (WTF) is a contributing factor....I don't know what to say except:

" Greedy capitalist kicks out valued local store to rent gouge. "

Good luck with your randian dream.
Title: Re: 4 out of 12 storefronts on 37th between 76th and 77th Streets are vacant
Post by: JDinJH on October 01, 2018, 10:17:32 PM
Always an axe to grind about gubmint'.

You guessed wrong. BTW There is no commercial rent regulation, and if you think LABEL REGULATION (WTF) is a contributing factor....I don't know what to say except:

" Greedy capitalist kicks out valued local store to rent gouge. "

Good luck with your randian dream.

I did not mean to be unclear. I was suggesting that pure capitalism, which was raised by dssjh, does not really exist in New York City.  To support my point, I in no way limited my examples to those that relate to store fronts.  For instance, I pointed to transportation costs.  What does the store fronts on 37th Avenue have to do with the metro train fares?  Not much; but, with regards to my larger point, all of my examples point to areas in our lives where the government regulate the capitalistic forces - for good or bad does not matter to make my point.  However, with regard to my larger point, I think it is hard for a small business to get started and survive the first five years because of the overbearing nature of the government regulatory apparatus in NYC, which are obstacles for a lot of small business owners.  One mistake can literally put a place out of business, e.g., the Department of Consumer Affairs can assume that an employer violated the law with regards to all employees if they can show that the employer violated the law with regards to one employee and then use this to impose per employee penalties of up to $1,000 per employee and past employees. The employer can defend and win and end up giving all that money to a lawyer.

Commercial landlords are not helping the situation either.  They ask for incredible amounts of money and are willing to keep their properties vacant until someone pays up.  The communities are the ones that ultimately pay the price.  Ultimately, I hope the places rent for establishments that will serve the communities needs and will stick around for years to come.  It would be nice to have a gastro-pub in the neighborhood.  One can dream.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JHMNY on December 18, 2018, 08:37:33 PM
It looks like we may be getting another empty storefront. The ladies clothing store located on the south side of 37th Avenue, between 79th and 80th Streets, The Ultimate Look, is closing. I wasn't aware of its longevity in the neighborhood. It's a pretty large space, so I'm wondering what will come next. Hopefully, it won't remain empty for long.

(https://i.imgur.com/YkWrxoc.jpg)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on December 18, 2018, 10:20:44 PM
that's too bad, it's pretty much the only place around where older ladies can find clothing in the area.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KDGHP on January 10, 2019, 01:03:25 PM
Is it weird to have a "wishlist" of things that I hope/want 37th Avenue to have this year?

1. A smaller Cannelle takeaway spot. Someone suggested this in another thread and Yes Please!
2. A real wine bar. Addictive 37 anyone? Is Swim Two Birds just never happening?  ;D
3. More great restaurants with potentially some cuisine variety and modern decor (Think Lamoon in Elmhurst)
4. Vintage Store - has anyone been to Bliss 46? It's so cute and would be fun to see something like that here.
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities
6. Fitness anything? Besides 2nd Story (love them), and the two gyms on Roosevelt, there are no fitness options here.

Here's what's def not on my wishlist: 99cent stores, pharmacies, laundromats, clothes stores selling the same clothes as all the others...we are oversaturated!!!

This is just me personally speaking - what do you all hope for?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: jh35 on January 10, 2019, 01:06:59 PM
Is it weird to have a "wishlist" of things that I hope/want 37th Avenue to have this year?

1. A smaller Cannelle takeaway spot. Someone suggested this in another thread and Yes Please!
2. A real wine bar. Addictive 37 anyone? Is Swim Two Birds just never happening?  ;D
3. More great restaurants with potentially some cuisine variety and modern decor (Think Lamoon in Elmhurst)
4. Vintage Store - has anyone been to Bliss 46? It's so cute and would be fun to see something like that here.
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities
6. Fitness anything? Besides 2nd Story (love them), and the two gyms on Roosevelt, there are no fitness options here.

Here's what's def not on my wishlist: 99cent stores, pharmacies, laundromats, clothes stores selling the same clothes as all the others...we are oversaturated!!!

This is just me personally speaking - what do you all hope for?

Dunkin Doughnuts is closing on 37th ave and 75th street. Can you imagine, JH can not even support a DD.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KDGHP on January 10, 2019, 01:20:44 PM


Dunkin Doughnuts is closing on 37th ave and 75th street. Can you imagine, JH can not even support a DD.
[/quote]

Have you noticed that other specialized bakeries and cafes, including Lety's and Espresso 77 seem to be thriving? People gravitate towards more community oriented businesses. It doesn't surprise me that Dunkin didn't fare well, especially since there are two others on Roosevelt (doing mighty fine biz I might add).
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Dudley on January 10, 2019, 01:21:59 PM
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities

We have El Barco De Papel on 80th St just south of Roosevelt. They have books in at least 2 languages, check it out sometime!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KDGHP on January 10, 2019, 01:26:12 PM
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities

We have El Barco De Papel on 80th St just south of Roosevelt. They have books in at least 2 languages, check it out sometime!

Admittedly, I don't spend a ton of time on Roosevelt, but I def will. Doesn't mean 37th Ave can't have one too.   ;D
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: jh35 on January 10, 2019, 01:32:04 PM


Have you noticed that other specialized bakeries and cafes, including Lety's and Espresso 77 seem to be thriving? People gravitate towards more community oriented businesses. It doesn't surprise me that Dunkin didn't fare well, especially since there are two others on Roosevelt (doing mighty fine biz I might add).
[/quote]

That is true but when someone tries to get a mainstream store, like Trader Joes or Fairway, the agents see that a Dunkin Doughnuts closed on 37th ave. They will not notice that Lety's is doing well.

I don't like DD but I saw it as mainstream store which I would encourage but others seem hostile to.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KDGHP on January 10, 2019, 01:35:20 PM


Have you noticed that other specialized bakeries and cafes, including Lety's and Espresso 77 seem to be thriving? People gravitate towards more community oriented businesses. It doesn't surprise me that Dunkin didn't fare well, especially since there are two others on Roosevelt (doing mighty fine biz I might add).

That is true but when someone tries to get a mainstream store, like Trader Joes or Fairway, the agents see that a Dunkin Doughnuts closed on 37th ave. They will not notice that Lety's is doing well.

I don't like DD but I saw it as mainstream store which I would encourage but others seem hostile to.
[/quote]

Ha - what I would give for a TJ's or Wegmans in the vicinity. Not on 37th Ave, but maybe on Northern? Brooklyn Navy Yard is getting a Wegmans, so who knows.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: the80s on January 10, 2019, 02:37:54 PM
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities

We have El Barco De Papel on 80th St just south of Roosevelt. They have books in at least 2 languages, check it out sometime!

Yes, agree that store is a neighborhood treasure that it took me too long to visit. A great spot.

Also, the last time I was in Kew & Willow Books in Kew Gardens, the owner mentioned that they were considering opening a second location, possibly in Jackson Heights since they've noticed a steady stream of customers visiting their store who live here.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on January 10, 2019, 02:40:31 PM


Quote

Ha - what I would give for a TJ's or Wegmans in the vicinity. Not on 37th Ave, but maybe on Northern? Brooklyn Navy Yard is getting a Wegmans, so who knows.

Maybe the new Amazon complex will encourage a little more interesting development along Northern Blvd instead of dozens of car dealerships.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 10, 2019, 04:46:01 PM


Dunkin Doughnuts is closing on 37th ave and 75th street. Can you imagine, JH can not even support a DD.

There's a Dunkin across from the subway at 74th, another one on Roosevelt and 81st and one on Northern just west of Jax Inn. JH can support three locations, just not four.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: European on January 10, 2019, 05:31:32 PM
I also heard that Appetiotto on 37th Avenue is for sale. I don't know if someone will continue the same business after it sells.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 10, 2019, 05:39:53 PM
I also heard that Appetiotto on 37th Avenue is for sale. I don't know if someone will continue the same business after it sells.

oh, no. i was so happy when that opened, long after the loss of Gourmet Fantasy Food. that's the food of my people, and it's been nice to have it so close.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: toque198 on January 10, 2019, 08:48:38 PM
I'd like to see a Reginald Perrin Grot Shop

https://youtu.be/fH-E6J5TJTY
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 13, 2019, 08:50:28 AM
slightly out of area, but i had to do an errand in Astoria that required a short walk up Steinway. Between Broadway and 30th ave (two blocks), there were 22 vacant stores, including the two largest, and two former banks. also, noticed three "going out of business" signs. this really is a pandemic in nyc.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on January 13, 2019, 10:06:41 AM
slightly out of area, but i had to do an errand in Astoria that required a short walk up Steinway. Between Broadway and 30th ave (two blocks), there were 22 vacant stores, including the two largest, and two former banks. also, noticed three "going out of business" signs. this really is a pandemic in nyc.

Wow, that's a lot. I'm often in Astoria and it seems there are really very few vacant storefronts between 30th Ave between Steinway and the N/W station at 30th Ave and 31st St. The businesses are quite a bit more upscale (mostly restaurants and cafes and markets) on 30th Ave than they are on Steinway. Steinway seems to have a lot of the lower end clothing stores, etc.

I wonder if it's just location (Steinway vs. 30th Ave) or if the LL's on Steinway are trying to charge too much in rent.

Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: ljr on January 13, 2019, 11:40:34 AM
KDGHP--are you new to JH? Because it's been a long-standing lament re: the empty storefronts and the seeming impossibility of small businesses making a go of it here. The commercial rents are astronomical--I think someone posted that they are higher than in places like Park Slope. It's a larger problem, of course, with everyone getting everything delivered by Amazon, Fresh Direct, etc. and retail stores going under: Toys R Us, Lord and Taylor's flagship store, etc.

The list you posted of businesses you'd like to see come to 37th sounds great but totally unrealistic judging by what actually manages to open here. When the Bruson Building had to be rebuilt due to the big fire, there were community town hall meetings where residents tried to influence what kinds of businesses would wind up in the new building. I recall hearing a rumor there might be a gourmet food market, for example.

In the end yes, we did get two new restaurants there, which is great--especially Romeo's which offers the area something different-- but I don't understand why the largest storefront is devoted to a home care business. Why does a business like that pay for a storefront location? It's a large space--I've never walked by during business hours, but is it filled with employees and clients meeting about home care arrangements? It seems so odd to have that business in that space--have you ever seen a storefront home care business anywhere else in NYC?

Then there is a bank and the same convenience store that used to operate there--one of many convenience stores along the avenue. Again, it's a larger issue that just 37th Ave in JH. Businesses close and then the storefront remains empty for years, I guess serving as a tax write-off to the landlord. Maybe the only way to improve the situation is to get rid of the tax incentives that may make it more profitable to keep the spaces empty than to rent them.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 13, 2019, 11:59:17 AM
slightly out of area, but i had to do an errand in Astoria that required a short walk up Steinway. Between Broadway and 30th ave (two blocks), there were 22 vacant stores, including the two largest, and two former banks. also, noticed three "going out of business" signs. this really is a pandemic in nyc.

Wow, that's a lot. I'm often in Astoria and it seems there are really very few vacant storefronts between 30th Ave between Steinway and the N/W station at 30th Ave and 31st St. The businesses are quite a bit more upscale (mostly restaurants and cafes and markets) on 30th Ave than they are on Steinway. Steinway seems to have a lot of the lower end clothing stores, etc.

I wonder if it's just location (Steinway vs. 30th Ave) or if the LL's on Steinway are trying to charge too much in rent.

the lower end clothing stores seem to be the biggest casualties. the huge Dr. Jays, which was something like a Conway at one point, is gone, too. restaurants, other than chains, are also dead in the water there.

you're right about 30th, though. i circled back down that avenue to pick up a couple of things i needed and it was humming with activity.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: jh35 on January 13, 2019, 12:01:58 PM

but I don't understand why the largest storefront is devoted to a home care business. Why does a business like that pay for a storefront location? It's a large space--I've never walked by during business hours, but is it filled with employees and clients meeting about home care arrangements? It seems so odd to have that business in that space--have you ever seen a storefront home care business anywhere else in NYC?


I have seen that business in action during the day. It is not a normal health care agency like Visiting Nurse. They entice people into thinking that they will make money taking care of people. They charge for a course and then try to hook people up with clients. I suppose it also attracts abusers who will charge medicare and medicaid for taking care of their relatives and friends.  If it were a normal agency, as you said, it would not be in a storefront. And, it would not have to cover the windows as it did after a while. It might as well be a bookie.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 13, 2019, 01:16:29 PM
wow. i had no idea, but the sleaze is not really surprising, given the huge come-on signs in the window. those places are the worst.

my mom had home aides through visiting nurse and catholic charities, and catholic charities occasionally had shift-fillers from one of those places. the worst care imaginable.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: ljr on January 13, 2019, 01:24:11 PM
I guess it's another example that would seem to support the notion that there may be a lot of businesses here that are less than legit, which is how they manage to stay afloat when real businesses can't.

I had no idea what that business was doing there, so thanks for the illuminating commentary.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KDGHP on January 13, 2019, 05:34:31 PM
KDGHP--are you new to JH?

New-ish in that I’ve been here about 2+ years, but I’m a NYC native. No transplant here. :)

While I appreciate that some of these ideas seem unrealistic, keep in mind that they’re a wishlist, so I know that some (or none) of these things may come to fruition. I DO think there’s a real market for some of these and would see success. It only takes one entrepreneur to spark the change.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 13, 2019, 07:02:19 PM
Astoria has gentrified at an incredibly rapid rate.

And gentrifiers would never go into the low end clothes stores that used to abound there on Steinway.

My guess is that Astoria (including Steinway)  will all be like Ditmars and 30 Ave soon.  (Hello Amazon) High end hip. Queens' Williamsburg. (Plus that Egyptian quarter)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 13, 2019, 07:46:08 PM
then, on to the big box stores. for when the hipsters get tired of artisinal mayo and move on to cases of diapers.

change is beauty. bland is new.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 13, 2019, 07:56:47 PM
There are always more young folks who arrive in NYC to take over. With new ideas.

That's what's brilliant about this city. Each year freshness arrives, fleeing from the suburbs/small towns/elsewhere.

Adding to the vibrancy and energy and change. Replacing those who are older and "tired and cynical and bitter".

It's the NYC cycle. Probably has been forever.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Simka on January 19, 2019, 12:57:34 AM
then, on to the big box stores. for when the hipsters get tired of artisinal mayo and move on to cases of diapers.

change is beauty. bland is new.

Well, they already have a Costco. I have a couple of friends who live in Williamsburg who make the trek to Costco every month or two.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: CaptainFlannel on January 19, 2019, 10:19:41 AM
Quote
It's the NYC cycle. Probably has been forever.

It's less about young folks from the suburbs moving in to the city, and much more about people with money taking over the city and making it unaffordable for those who grew up in neighborhoods to be able to stay in those neighborhoods or elsewhere in the city.  Getting priced out of the city entirely is not something people living in 1980 NYC worried about.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 19, 2019, 11:36:13 AM
you are absolutely correct, Captain. my first NYC apartments -- from roughly '82 to '87 -- were all under $500 for two/three BR. all were in undesirable areas that people now love. only one exists as it did when i lived there (though clearly fixed up). we paid $275 for a two BR on Eagle St. in Greenpoint in 1985. checked street easy late last year, and the exact apartment was renting for $2900. that's not "keeping up with inflation."
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 19, 2019, 11:52:10 AM
From what I have read about the olden days, people were FLEEING and FRIGHTENED in the city in that era.

White flight and all.

Probably that's why apartments were inexpensive. Less folks wanted them!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: pynchoff on January 19, 2019, 12:43:03 PM
I lived in a 1200 square foot loft on 26 and 6th ave. in the mid to late 70's for 160 dollars a month. It had a huge skylight and a fireplace. The streets were deserted at night, but there were a lot of jazz musicians living all around me. Great music all thorough the night.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on January 19, 2019, 12:46:35 PM
white flight happened, but it was a decade or more before that happened. post late 60s riots and post blackout (in the case of Bushwick).

neighborhoods like Greenpoint, Astoria, the upper part of Yorkville, Ditmas Park were mostly white and rents were cheap...these were working class areas.  not fancy. if your landlord raised your rent, or your immediate area became too pricey, you could move a subway stop or two further and be back in a good spot. there are no more cheap places to live -- wages have not quadrupled or quintupled along with rents.

 
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 19, 2019, 01:30:38 PM
Certain cities became international/global cities since the 80's..

New York (amongst others) is definitely one of them.

Every international city like London/Sydney/Shanghai/Vancouver etc became expensive.

It's a world-wide phenomenon.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on January 19, 2019, 02:05:04 PM
if your landlord raised your rent, or your immediate area became too pricey, you could move a subway stop or two further and be back in a good spot.

What you are describing is EXACTLY what happens along the L train today.

The stops getting towards Broadway Junction are still affordable.

Nothing really has changed DSSJH for young folks. Except it's all a bit further out in the boroughs.

Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Simka on January 20, 2019, 02:42:26 PM
I lived in a 1200 square foot loft on 26 and 6th ave. in the mid to late 70's for 160 dollars a month. It had a huge skylight and a fireplace. The streets were deserted at night, but there were a lot of jazz musicians living all around me. Great music all thorough the night.

Wow! Was the flea market there yet?

I knew people who lived in SoHo lofts in the '80s. They'd found these incredibly cheap raw spaces and put some money into them to make them livable. But then all that began to change.

I can't speak with any authority about this, but I don't think there are many empty or mostly unused buildings whose owners will let you create living spaces in them anymore. I'd be curious to know about that.

And while there are neighborhoods with cheaper rents that are further out in the boroughs, with the termination of rent control and the gutting of rent stabilization, I suspect it's hard to find really good deals anywhere in the city these days.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 12, 2019, 04:28:48 PM
here's a thought.....

https://www.bizjournals.com/newyork/news/2019/02/11/mayor-wants-a-vacancy-tax-for-empty-storefronts.html
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Chingwa on February 12, 2019, 07:20:02 PM
Ridiculous.  NY politicians never met a problem they couldn't tax.  DeBlasio needs to go.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 12, 2019, 08:25:06 PM
not a tax. a removal of a tax break. end welfare for the rich.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Chingwa on February 12, 2019, 11:31:16 PM
I can't read the article as it's behind a pay wall.  All I can read is a one-sentence summary:
"Let's pass a smart, targeted tax to stop landlords from leaving their properties empty," de Blasio said.

Not all landlords are evil rich people though.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Paul11372 on February 13, 2019, 08:55:09 AM
not a tax. a removal of a tax break. end welfare for the rich.


Yes, lets do exactly that:
https://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/politics/albany/2018/01/29/foxs-gotham-just-got-nys-largest-tax-break/1075932001/
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JK resident on February 13, 2019, 11:32:43 AM
This would a micromanagement of the retail scene. It would be hard to enfoand will challenged in court.

http://commercialobserver.com/2018/04/real-estate-board-brokers-outraged-about-vacancy-tax-talks/

The film tax break has nothing to do with this.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: StevenGrey on February 23, 2019, 01:44:31 PM
I thought I would share this video from Facebook about the empty storefront "crisis" here in NYC:

https://www.facebook.com/DisappearingNYC/videos/396486050928610/
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 23, 2019, 02:39:10 PM
or, more appropriately, "NYC."
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 23, 2019, 04:33:13 PM
I thought I would share this video from Facebook about the empty storefront "crisis" here in NYC:

https://www.facebook.com/DisappearingNYC/videos/396486050928610/

A way to help solve this issue might be to encourage legislation that sells new individual shop fronts exactly like condos or co-ops. In which case the store owner can actually buy his/her store while creating his/her business...
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 23, 2019, 07:14:24 PM
retail condo space is out there, but it's generally out of the reach of the small businessperson. the listings on loopnet are all in the seven figure range (some way up into there). maybe there's a way to bring that down a bit in low-rent areas, but i don't know that there's a way to do it here
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 24, 2019, 10:20:41 AM
retail condo space is out there, but it's generally out of the reach of the small businessperson. the listings on loopnet are all in the seven figure range (some way up into there). maybe there's a way to bring that down a bit in low-rent areas, but i don't know that there's a way to do it here

Against my better judgement, I will reply to this. Even though I am well aware it will result in eventually you TRYING to insult me one way or another. And me sighing and shrugging my shoulders.

It's like the story of the scorpion and the frog.  When the frog asks the scorpion why the scorpion stung him, dooming them both, the scorpion replies that it was in its nature to do so.

The expensive retail condos and units  for sale are usually big spaces.  Not 100 or 200 or 300 square feet for beginner businesses. Or even smaller 50 square feet which is where a tiny business might start and then grow to a larger premise.

 
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JK resident on February 24, 2019, 10:45:01 AM
50 square feet? Nobody is going to develop micro stores to help small entrepreneurs. A bunch of small stores would be a real eyesore and probably a fire hazard. Rents may be expensive in but I like shopping in 1000sf+ stores.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 24, 2019, 11:03:01 AM
50 square feet is probably bigger than many food vans.  And they are everywhere.

BTW JK Resident, you would continue to be free to shop wherever you like. 

So there is clarity, I am not suggesting forced shopping.

Also, I am not speaking of renting, I am speaking of buying the retail condo/co-op just like the NYC real estate apartment market ranges from places you can purchase... from micro-apartments onwards.

The solution here is to stop what is happening in Stephen Grey's video above.

Please feel free to do research by watching the video.

Eventually, the retail condo market will happen.  It's a solution for the future.  And I realize that anything new...or any changes... always appear to upset many folks. Those many people who tend to be reactionary by nature.

Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 24, 2019, 12:46:28 PM
i wasn't trying to insult you. i was actually suggesting it might be tenable.

food carts are certainly 50 SF. food trucks are larger. my storage space is 60 square feet. if i stood in it with two customers, we couldn't turn around, much less transact business. customers don't browse through merchandise in a food van.

it's reactionary to think we'll revert to small spaces - the kinds that might have existed a century ago -- but pushcarts, those might work.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 24, 2019, 12:56:21 PM
i wasn't trying to insult you. i was actually suggesting it might be tenable.

my storage space is 60 square feet. if i stood in it with two customers, we couldn't turn around, much less transact business. customers don't browse through merchandise in a food van.

it's reactionary to think we'll revert to small spaces - the kinds that might have existed a century ago -- but pushcarts, those might work.

"A scorpion asks a frog to carry him over a river. The frog is afraid of being stung, but the scorpion argues that if it did so, both would sink and the scorpion would drown. The frog then agrees, but midway across the river the scorpion does indeed sting the frog, dooming them both."
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on February 24, 2019, 12:58:56 PM
you're repeating yourself. another Trumpian tactic. you're better than that.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 24, 2019, 01:06:23 PM
you're repeating yourself. another Trumpian tactic. you're better than that.

And here come the insults...

It's hilarious really. After all these years, the exact same pattern.

It reminds me of RUSSIAN DOLL on Netflix.  The content changes but the outcome is identical.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Alfster on February 27, 2019, 11:56:59 AM
50 square feet? Nobody is going to develop micro stores to help small entrepreneurs. A bunch of small stores would be a real eyesore and probably a fire hazard. Rents may be expensive in but I like shopping in 1000sf+ stores.

50 SqFt?  What a waste that would be.  I can't imagine retail becoming so tiny.  What's next?  Set up card tables in pop up shops in long empty retail stores?  Sad
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on February 27, 2019, 12:26:32 PM
50 square feet? Nobody is going to develop micro stores to help small entrepreneurs. A bunch of small stores would be a real eyesore and probably a fire hazard. Rents may be expensive in but I like shopping in 1000sf+ stores.

50 SqFt?  What a waste that would be.  I can't imagine retail becoming so tiny.  What's next?  Set up card tables in pop up shops in long empty retail stores?  Sad

Ok, great, 100 square feet minimum. The important point is really about the biz owner being able to buy the retail space and thus not being forced out.  (Folks seem to have gotten fixated on 50 square feet minimum).  If 1000 commercial square feet is 1 million dollars to buy, say...then 100 square feet could be $100K.  Pretty affordable for a biz (with a mortgage). And then no fear of commercial landlords raising rents,  leading to eviction, ever.  Just like for people who buy their apts/co-ops.

....This idea comes is in relation to the video in Steven Grey's comment above. 

------------------------------------------------------
Quote from: StevenGrey on February 23, 2019, 01:44:31 PM
I thought I would share this video from Facebook about the empty storefront "crisis" here in NYC:

https://www.facebook.com/DisappearingNYC/videos/396486050928610/

--------------------------------------------------------
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KGDHP on May 04, 2019, 03:43:39 PM
Passed by the Ultimate Look space yesterday and there were definitely people inside renovating. Does anyone have any Intel on what might be coming? (Please not another bakery or pharmacy
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: ljr on May 04, 2019, 04:25:52 PM
We do have a lot of bakeries now, more every day. Temptation lurks everywhere!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: itsit on May 05, 2019, 02:56:28 PM
 Is it true that AOC's office in the Bruson Building pays 17,000. in rent each month- at least I think I heard that-
so why wouldn't landlords hold out thinking that big payday will come? Its awful but unless our politicians can
change the laws this is the system we are stuck with.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: stevn on May 06, 2019, 12:10:35 PM
Is it true that AOC's office in the Bruson Building pays 17,000. in rent each month- at least I think I heard that-
so why wouldn't landlords hold out thinking that big payday will come? Its awful but unless our politicians can
change the laws this is the system we are stuck with.

Ocasio-Cortez said much of her office staff was comprised of people from the Jackson Heights community and she explained why she took space in the rebuilt Bruson Building located at 74-09 37th Ave. instead of former Congressman Joe Crowley’s old office suite. She said the landlord doubled the rent to $15,000 a month, but rent the third-floor offices at the Bruson Building is $5,400 a month.

https://qns.com/story/2019/03/05/ocasio-cortez-opens-district-office-in-jackson-heights-with-a-different-take-on-amazon/
Title: NY Times feature on empty storefronts (not JH area)
Post by: Shelby2 on June 14, 2019, 12:38:57 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/09/06/nyregion/nyc-storefront-vacancy.html

This Space Available
By Corey Kilgannon
Photographs by Todd Heisler
Sept. 6, 2018

They proliferate like gaps in an otherwise welcoming smile, vacant storefronts along New York City’s most popular retail corridors.

They are stripped of their contents and their signs, replaced by For Rent banners that can be seen along entire stretches of otherwise thriving shopping zones.

“When you walk the streets, you see vacancies on every block in all five boroughs, rich or poor areas — even on Madison Avenue, where you used to have to fight to get space,” said Faith Hope Consolo, head of retail leasing for Douglas Elliman Real Estate, who said the increase in storefront vacancies in New York City had created “the most challenging retail landscape in my 25 years in real estate.”

A survey conducted by Douglas Elliman found that about 20 percent of all retail space in Manhattan is currently vacant, she said, compared with roughly 7 percent in 2016.

While a commercial crisis might more likely be associated with periods of economic distress, this one comes during an era of soaring prosperity, in a city teeming with tourism and booming with development.

That has aggravated the vacancy problem by producing a glut of new commercial real estate.


Particularly hard hit are gentrifying areas in Brooklyn and many of Manhattan’s top retail strips in some of the world’s priciest shopping districts, from Broadway in SoHo to Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side.

Soaring rents and competition from online shopping have forced out many beloved mom-and-pop shops, which many residents say decimates neighborhoods and threatens New York’s unique character. Then there is the blight that shuttered stores bring, including vagrants, graffiti and trash.

Some tenants blame the warehousing of storefronts by landlords waiting for development deals or zoning changes, or simply holding out for top rental dollars from large corporate retailers like drugstores, banks and restaurant chains. But even many national chains have shrunk their roster of stores.

Some landlords say they simply cannot find retail tenants willing to lock in long-term leases at rents that enable them to meet building payments. Others say that retailers are not biting, even at bargain rents. Whatever the factors, the vacancies are changing the look of the city’s streetscape.

Click link at top for article
Title: Re: NY Times feature on empty storefronts (not JH area)
Post by: dssjh on June 14, 2019, 01:05:36 PM
yes, modern developments like online retail are impacting the sector. but if you look at LoopNet once in a while, you'll see the same spaces vacant for 18 months, two years, no drop in the overly "ambitious" asking price. these landlords don't care if the spaces stay vacant. they get a break, and always will, even as tax breaks are taken away from homeowners.
Title: Re: NY Times feature on empty storefronts (not JH area)
Post by: EmmBee on June 14, 2019, 03:23:53 PM
There has been talk about a fee charged to landlords that hold storefronts vacant for prolonged periods.  Sounds great to me.  I'm not sure if there's been much movement on this, though.

https://ny.curbed.com/2018/4/2/17188918/de-blasio-retail-blight-new-york-vacancy-fee

Title: Re: NY Times feature on empty storefronts (not JH area)
Post by: Shelby2 on July 24, 2019, 05:30:48 PM
https://gothamist.com/2019/07/24/empty_storefront_update.php

In A Bid To Help Small Businesses, New York City Will Start Tracking Retail Vacancies

In an attempt to respond to the well-chronicled struggles of small retailers, New York City will begin compiling a database of storefronts that will track vacancies and hopefully prompt future policies toward aiding small business owners.

The city has been in the grips of a vacancy crisis, which has been largely attributed to rising rents and the dominance of online retailers. With the passage of five bills on Tuesday, the City Council is hoping to gain a better understanding of the problem. Three of the bills require annual reporting on storefront vacancies, the business environment, and specific tracking of mom-and-pop shops. The data, which will be gathered by the Department of Finance, will include size as well as occupancy status and monthly rents if the property is being leased.

see link for more
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: toddg on August 08, 2019, 07:27:42 PM
Jackson Heights Post: Jackson Heights has the Healthiest Retail Among 24 NYC Neighborhoods: Report (https://jacksonheightspost.com/jackson-heights-has-the-healthiest-retail-among-24-nyc-neighborhoods-report)

Here's the original report: Assessing Storefront Vacancy in NYC (https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/planning/download/pdf/planning-level/housing-economy/assessing-storefront-vacancy-nyc.pdf)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Beherenow on August 09, 2019, 08:56:29 AM
"Jackson Heights has the Healthiest Retail Among 24 NYC Neighborhoods: Report"

Interesting. I suppose people have different definitions of "healthy." If it means a pharmacy  every two blocks and plenty of large retail banks that are practically deserted, JH wins!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on August 09, 2019, 11:49:42 AM
This got me thinking about that empty store next to Starbucks. I believe it used to be a hairdresser salon called Ingrid's...
That's a prime location...but has been empty for years now.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JHMNY on August 09, 2019, 12:06:04 PM
This got me thinking about that empty store next to Starbucks. I believe it used to be a hairdresser salon called Ingrid's...
That's a prime location...but has been empty for years now.

I heard that a medical office currently located above the Starbucks is going to move to that corner Ingrid's space. But yeah, if that's the case, it's taking forever to happen.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on August 09, 2019, 08:21:22 PM
This got me thinking about that empty store next to Starbucks. I believe it used to be a hairdresser salon called Ingrid's...
That's a prime location...but has been empty for years now.

I heard that a medical office currently located above the Starbucks is going to move to that corner Ingrid's space. But yeah, if that's the case, it's taking forever to happen.

doesn't a fully windowed, no-privacy space seem like a bad place to put a medical office?
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: JHMNY on August 09, 2019, 08:36:25 PM
doesn't a fully windowed, no-privacy space seem like a bad place to put a medical office?

Lol. I agree, but I’ve been hearing the medical office thing for a while now. Maybe they realized it wouldn’t work out after all.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Simka on September 29, 2019, 01:22:56 PM
Jackson Heights is mentioned in a NY1 piece on empty commercial spaces.

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/news/2019/09/26/rise-in-vacant-storefronts-attributed-to-skyrocketing-rent
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: r on September 29, 2019, 02:41:24 PM
Jackson Heights is mentioned in a NY1 piece on empty commercial spaces.

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/news/2019/09/26/rise-in-vacant-storefronts-attributed-to-skyrocketing-rent

That report seems... very wrong. It says that Jackson Heights has some of the highest vacancy rates in NYC, but earlier reports said that Jackson Heights has some of the lowest vacancy rates in NYC

e.g. https://jacksonheightspost.com/jackson-heights-has-the-healthiest-retail-among-24-nyc-neighborhoods-report

e.g. https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/on-small-business/empty-storefronts-jolt-nyc-council-into-action-on-small-business/2019/08/12/5ebabaa8-bd21-11e9-a8b0-7ed8a0d5dc5d_story.html

And just from walking around Jackson Heights, the vacancy rate does seem very low here compared to walking around Manhattan.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: r on September 29, 2019, 02:50:01 PM
e.g. from https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/planning/download/pdf/planning-level/housing-economy/assessing-storefront-vacancy-nyc.pdf
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: buzz on October 14, 2019, 12:20:39 PM
There was a sign of construction over one of the empty stores.  All Chinese. Beijing is taking over.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Shelby2 on November 28, 2019, 09:45:52 AM
I was surprised to see the large Duane Reade on the corner of Steinway and Broadway in Astoria completely gone. Not sure if there's anything slated to come into that space or if it will remain empty while they look for a new tenant.

(https://i.imgur.com/0cLdhgI.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on November 28, 2019, 12:46:33 PM
there's another one at 35th and broadway (four short blocks) and one at 28th and Steinway. maybe the chain finally realized they don't need that much saturation.

steinway is a ghost town, for what it's worth. even bank buildings are empty.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Ms. Jackson on November 29, 2019, 08:11:40 AM
Walgreens is closing a bunch of Duane Reades throughout the City. As DSSJH mentions the number of stores only a couple blocks away in either direction, it is obvious why that one was chosen. I wonder if any in our neighborhood are under consideration.

https://gothamist.com/news/duane-reade-nyc-closing

I was surprised to see the large Duane Reade on the corner of Steinway and Broadway in Astoria completely gone. Not sure if there's anything slated to come into that space or if it will remain empty while they look for a new tenant.

(https://i.imgur.com/0cLdhgI.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on November 29, 2019, 09:35:31 AM
Eventually, once 50% of storefronts are empty, the rents for commercial storefronts will be forced to decrease.

Supply and demand.

So perhaps in the future we may have far more interesting stores. As the cost of rent for stores plummets, folks can take more risks.

Could all be positive. But there'll be up to 5 years of empty storefronts to endure around us first...before the commercial store rent market collapses.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on November 29, 2019, 11:05:41 AM
i admire that optimism. and while i don't see commercial landlords agreeing to lower rents as long as they get tax breaks for keeping storefronts empty, i hope you're right.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: dssjh on December 01, 2019, 08:22:38 AM
not off topic, but out of area....even McDonald's is getting squeezed out of the market.
A Brooklyn McDonald’s isn’t lovin’ a massive rent increase proposed by a new landlord.

The golden arches outpost on Atlantic Avenue in Prospect Heights, which recently underwent extensive renovations and extended its lease through 2039, claims Vanderbilt Atlantic Holdings LLC — eager to get the eatery out so it can build “lucrative, high-density” housing — is turning the screws.

The McD’s, just down the street from Barclays Center, says Vanderbilt is trying to up the rent 545%, from about $14,000 a month to nearly $90,000. The ubiquitous fast-food chain is suing Vanderbilt in Brooklyn federal court for “attempting to corrupt a contractually required fair-market rental-valuation process.”

for the entire article, click link (no paywall)


https://nypost.com/2019/11/30/landlord-hits-brooklyn-mcdonalds-with-super-sized-rent-increase/
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: jo3boxer on December 01, 2019, 10:03:31 AM
the mcdonald's in flushing, that has been there as long as I can remember, also closed abruptly. one day we went by and it was there, and shortly after it looked as if it had been gone for ages.

i guess the same thing happened with the one on roosevelt where laly's now is.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: hfm on December 02, 2019, 11:47:28 PM
the mcdonald's in flushing, that has been there as long as I can remember, also closed abruptly. one day we went by and it was there, and shortly after it looked as if it had been gone for ages.

i guess the same thing happened with the one on roosevelt where laly's now is.

Laly's is a significant upgrade though.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Open Borders Books on August 01, 2020, 06:49:52 PM
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities

We have El Barco De Papel on 80th St just south of Roosevelt. They have books in at least 2 languages, check it out sometime!

Yes, agree that store is a neighborhood treasure that it took me too long to visit. A great spot.

Also, the last time I was in Kew & Willow Books in Kew Gardens, the owner mentioned that they were considering opening a second location, possibly in Jackson Heights since they've noticed a steady stream of customers visiting their store who live here.

I work with a small collective of local residents that wants very much to bring a bookstore to Jackson Heights. Right now, we're selling books every Sunday on 34th Avenue between 79th and 80th Street from 10am to 2pm (weather permitting), and donating half of the proceeds to local aid organizations. Check us out at openbordersbooks.org (http://openbordersbooks.org) and come say hi!

Yours,
Jeff
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: abcdefghijk on August 02, 2020, 09:45:42 AM
5. A Bookstore - We need a bookstore desperately, including books in various languages to serve the various communities

We have El Barco De Papel on 80th St just south of Roosevelt. They have books in at least 2 languages, check it out sometime!

Yes, agree that store is a neighborhood treasure that it took me too long to visit. A great spot.

Also, the last time I was in Kew & Willow Books in Kew Gardens, the owner mentioned that they were considering opening a second location, possibly in Jackson Heights since they've noticed a steady stream of customers visiting their store who live here.

I work with a small collective of local residents that wants very much to bring a bookstore to Jackson Heights. Right now, we're selling books every Sunday on 34th Avenue between 79th and 80th Street from 10am to 2pm (weather permitting), and donating half of the proceeds to local aid organizations. Check us out at openbordersbooks.org (http://openbordersbooks.org) and come say hi!

Yours,
Jeff

Great. You might be able to run a pop up (month to month or no lease) bookstore in one of the empty storefronts.

And run it like Housingworks Cafe/Bookstore in Soho. Which relies on volunteer (unpaid)  folks working as staff to keep it viable.
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: KGDHP on August 02, 2020, 12:59:23 PM
Jeff, I saw you earlier today on 34th and with the crowd that had gathered, I still maintain that a bookstore would do incredibly well in this neighborhood. Especially if it offered access to some services as well as great programming. I know I would be a patron for sure. I fully support your efforts and applaud you guys!
Title: Re: Empty store fronts
Post by: Fedup on August 02, 2020, 04:13:31 PM
I agree! And I would be fully onboard to staff it once a week as a volunteer!!